Back to Glencoe

Outdoor adventures

If you want to see Glencoe at its best, bring your walking boots and your wet-weather gear – you’ll be rewarded with some outstanding views over the Pass of Glencoe, Loch Leven and Glen Etive, as well as the chance to see lots of rare wildlife and some of Scotland’s most poignant historical sites.

Glencoe walks

Thousands of people come to Glencoe every year to explore this dramatic and inspiring landscape on foot. There’s something for walkers of all abilities and interests here, from tranquil lochside trails to routes through historic sites and epic mountain hikes with breathtaking views across the Highlands.

For beginners and anyone with young children, the An Torr trails explore the woodland in the central part of the glen and lead you to places like Signal Rock and the picturesque Clachaig Burn. The walks take around one hour altogether, and you can start from the main car park off the A82, or pop into the visitor centre first.

Coire Gabhail (also known as the Hidden Valley) lets you walk in the footsteps of the MacDonalds of Glencoe, who hid their rustled cattle in this spectacular glen. The relatively easy-going route takes between 23 hours, and along the way you’ll get incredible views of the Three Sisters and the River Coe gorge.

Glencoe is home to eight Munros, some of which are easier to bag than others (although any mountain hike requires lots of stamina and proper planning). The most recognisable peak is the pyramid-shaped Buachaille Etive Mòr, which has a long, steep route to the summit that will take at least 7 hours. The views from the top extend out to Mull and beyond and are well worth the climb.

Perhaps better for Munro-bagging beginners is Mòr’s often-overlooked neighbour, Buachaille Etive Beag. To reach the top you’ll need to put aside between 5 and 6 hours, but there’s a good path that makes the route easier. The views from the top across Loch Etive and over the surrounding peaks are utterly unforgettable.

One route that’s strictly for the most experienced climbers is the ridge of Aonach Eagach, which crosses two Munros and is the narrowest on the British mainland. Even the bravest and fittest mountain walkers are given fair warning before attempting this rocky high-altitude hike – to complete it you’ll need a whole day, as well as a seriously good head for heights.

For more information on walking in Glencoe, and updates on routes and walking conditions, call the visitor centre to speak to our Welcome Team.

Outdoor adventures at Glencoe

Glencoe is also world-renowned for rock climbers, and under snow and ice, becomes one of Scotland’s most popular winter climbing and skiing locations.

Glen Etive is a favourite spot for campers, while the pools, waterfalls and rapids of the River Etive are cherished by wild swimmers and paddlers alike.

Throughout the summer months, our popular Land Rover safaris transport you through Glencoe, going slightly off the beaten track. You can choose between a 1½-hour or 3-hour tour, and learn all about the history, wildlife, geology and more! Check our Events page for more information.

Walks here

Two walkers following a trail into the mountains.

An Torr trails

Difficulty
Easy
Time
Blue Trail – 45 mins; Black Trail – 1 hour; Yellow Trail – 25mins
Distance
Blue Trail – 1¼ miles; Black Trail – just over 1 mile; Yellow Trail – ¾ mile
Facilities
Car park
A view of the mountains from the Glencoe Visitor Centre viewing platform

Woodland trails

Difficulty
Easy
Time
30 minutes
Distance
Blue Trail – just over 1 mile; Black Trail – ½ mile; Yellow Trail – 300m (the Yellow Trail is an all-access trail)
Facilities
Car park

To find walks at National Trust for Scotland places, download the Trust Trails app.

NTS Trail App