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6 Mar 2017

Loch Lomond, The Trossachs, Stirling & Forth Valley

Ben Lomond
Spreading right across central Scotland, the Loch Lomond, The Trossachs, Stirling & Forth Valley region features many of the Trust’s most captivating properties.

Alloa Tower is a 14th-century keep and the ancestral home of the Erskines, one of Scotland’s most influential families. The sparse medieval exterior gives no indication of what lies inside. In the 18th century, the Erskines decided they no longer required the protection of a defensive tower and lavishly updated the interior into an opulent mansion.

Stand shoulder to shoulder with soldiers from either side of the Battle of Bannockburn.

The Trust’s award-winning Battle of Bannockburn visitor centre takes you right to the heart of the action of the medieval battle that changed the path of Scotland’s history. Stand shoulder to shoulder with soldiers from either side, hear their stories, hold their weapons – and then head out to the battleground where Robert the Bruce led his men to victory against the mighty force of the English army.

Ben Lomond is Scotland's most southerly Munro.

Ben Lomond is Scotland’s most southerly Munro and its breathtaking location on the banks of Loch Lomond attracts over 30,000 walkers and climbers every year. Dollar Glen’s network of woodland walks is another scenic way to experience Scotland’s great outdoors and our diverse wildlife and plantlife – and there’s even the added bonus of a brooding medieval castle.

Menstrie Castle is not all it seems. Rather than being the classic Scottish fortress that its exterior suggests, it was actually built as a cosy home for the Alexander family. Today, it houses a museum dedicated to the founding of Nova Scotia.

Moirlanich Longhouse in Glen Lochay provides an enthralling look at rural life in days gone by – it shows how four generations of the Robertson family lived, from 1809 to 1968.

We've even got a pineapple-shaped summer house!

And finally – the Pineapple, Scotland’s most eccentric folly! Built by the Earl of Dunmore as a bizarre summerhouse from where he could admire the view, the Pineapple looks over a tranquil walled garden, which is now an oasis for wildlife.