Cottages

The National Trust for Scotand has a wonderful collection of cottages to choose from, full of character and charm with many original features, stunning views and gardens.

page 1 2 3 4 5 6  > show all

East Lodge, Crathes Castle Garden & Estate

  • Dates Available
  •  None
  • Royal Deeside
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Opening October 2016.
Read More >
Laced with gothic charm this Victorian gate lodge guards the entrance to Crathes Castle. Crathes is a Renaissance dream of winding turrets and pink-harled walls, set among acres of manicured gardens.

The lodge's arched latticed windows look out onto the castle driveway. An enclosed private garden with a picnic table is perfect for outdoor dining when the sun shines.

 

Accommodation details



  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin


  • Sitting room with dining area


  • Kitchen


  • Shower room with WC


  • Oil fired central heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Parking available outside the cottage


  • EPC Rating: F34


 

About Crathes Castle

Crathes estate dates back to 1323 when King Robert the Bruce granted the lands of Leys to the ancient Burnett family. The jewelled ivory Horn of Leys, symbolic of the gift, now hangs in the castle's Great Hall. The castle you see today was completed in the late 16th century and retains ornate ceilings, family portraits and even a 'trick-step' designed to confuse attackers.

 

Six different trails lead round the 240 hectare (595 acre) estate. Crathes's grounds are known as a hotspot for spying bats, as well as buzzards, kingfishers and herons.

 

About the area

Crathes is a settlement of around 25 houses, spreading out into farms and countryside, close to Banchory in Royal Deeside.

 

Things to do



  • Steam-train enthusiasts will love the Royal Deeside Railway. Still undergoing a restoration project, the railway line currently runs for a mile along the River Dee.


  • Pack up a hamper and head to the Linn of Dee, a 300 metre rock gorge, part of Mar Lodge estate and one of Queen Victoria's beloved picnicking spots.


  • In the summer months, trace Scottish architectural history through the ages with a visit to
  • Drum Castle, the oldest intact building in the National Trust for Scotland's care. A medieval tower, a Jacobean mansion and Victorian extensions make this fortified ancestral home truly unique.


 

Getting there

Crathes Castle is off the A93, 15 miles west of Aberdeen and 3 miles east of Banchory. Aberdeen is the nearest railway station, and Aberdeen airport (Dyce) is 12 miles away. < Hide

show full details & prices

Lydia Cottage, Cromarty

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 2
  • 1
  • Dogs allowed
This traditional Cromarty cottage was built around 1911 on the site of Cromarty's former fire station. Fully refurbished with modern creature comforts it provides a spacious base for two people to explore the wildlife and history at the heart of this Black Isle town.
Read More >
The cottage lies in Cromarty's Fishertown area, once populated by herring fishers and close enough to hear the waves lapping against the shores of the Cromarty Firth. An enclosed garden with a picnic table is perfect for summer barbeques.

 

Accommodation details



  • 2 storeys - detached cottage


  • Sleeps 2 - 1 twin bedroom


  • Sitting room


  • Kitchen with dining area


  • Shower room with double shower


  • Open fire


  • Electric storage heaters and electric immersion heater


  • Parking available at eastern gable end of cottage - not reserved but usually available


  • Public transport accessible


  • EPC Rating: D64


  • The first floor is accessed by a spiral staircase and is not suitable for anyone with mobility issues




 

About the area

Cromarty has plenty to enchant both travellers and holidaymakers: sandy beaches, Georgian architecture, bottlenose dolphins, and bird colonies of international importance. It first became a Royal Burgh in the 13th century. In the 1700s salt-fish processing and sea-trade helped to swell the town's economy, and many of its famous merchants' houses date from this era.

 

Cromarty is only 40 minutes' drive from Inverness, the "capital of the Highlands".

 

Things to do



  • Visit the birthplace of Hugh Miller. Miller was a stonemason, geologist and writer, whose thatched cottage is now a museum with a colourful garden of native plants.


  • Climb the 'Hundred steps' to South Sutor, accessed via the Reeds Park Path along the shore at the east end of town. The Sutors are rocks on either side of the firth thought once to be the abode of two giant shoemakers.


  • You'll be less than an hour's drive from Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.




 

Getting there

Cromarty is 22 miles north-east of Inverness. From the Kessock Bridge in Inverness, follow the A9 north until signs for A832 to Cromarty. < Hide

show full details & prices

Crovie Cottage, Crovie

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Aberdeen & Grampian
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
This cosy, restored traditional fishing cottage dates from a time when the sea was the only mode of transport to and from Scotland's shores, and provided the livelihood for coastal communities. Perched on Crovie's unusual seashore rocky shelf the sitting room windows look out to the bay, enclosed north and south by magnificent cliffs.
Read More >
17th century wood panelling and an open fire complete Crovie Cottage's old sea dog charm. In the summertime, take to the private garden and make use of the cottage's barbeque.

 

Accommodation details



  • 2 storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 single, 1 box bed in sitting room


  • Sitting/dining room with sea view and open fire


  • Shower room


  • Kitchen


  • Private garden with patio and barbeque


  • WiFi


  • Fitted electric Dimplex heating


 

...Our guests said...

"...more and more reluctant to venture away from Crovie, preferring to sit in front of the cottage and watch the changing seascape and tides, the coming & going of fishing boats, and the glorious sunsets".

 

About the area

Crovie is a unique place, a conservation village created on a seashore ledge so narrow it has only enough room for the cottages built on it and a small footpath. The cliffs that stretch above it form the east side of Gamrie Bay; on the other side of the village is the sea.

 

Crovie comprises around 50 fishing cottages, most of which date back 150 years or more, and is one of the best preserved fishing villages in Europe. A pebble beach to the west end of the winding path leads to the next village, Gardenstown, one mile away. Look out for bottlenosed dolphins along the way.

 

Things to do



  • Sample Cullen Skink in the town it hails from. The traditional smoked haddock soup is a hearty winter warmer. Cullen village is just over 20 miles away.


  • Tee off in one of the area's 50 nearby golf courses, and re-charge your batteries afterwards in Gardenstown's 18th century inn.


  • See how the other half lived at Fyvie Castle, just over 25 miles away. Sculpted turrets and fine tapestries give the castle a fairytale feel and it is steeped in local legends and myths.


 

Getting there

From Banff head through Macduff on A98 towards Fraserburgh. 0.50 mile after Macduff take B9031 left turn Gardenstown. 8 miles later take Crovie turn to left.

 

This cottage is privately owned. Please note that bookings are restricted to full weeks only (Saturday to Saturday), short breaks are not available at this property. The entry time to the cottage is from 5pm onwards on day of arrival. Parking is available for residents and their guests at the north-west end of the village. Parking in high season can require skill and patience. If the lower car park alongside the village is full, there is additional parking on the road to the village - luggage can be off-loaded at the bottom and taken by wheelbarrow (stored in the back garden). < Hide

show full details & prices

page 1 2 3 4 5 6  > show all