Lighthouse Accommodation

If you are looking for something slightly more unusual why not choose to stay at a lighthouse? The properties are ex-lighthousekeepers' homes, and letting them as self-catering not only gives guests the opportunity to stay in these extraordinary, remote and exciting locations, but provides an income for both charities.

We have lighthouse accommodation on North Ronaldsay, Orkney and Covesea, Lossiemouth.
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Covesea Skerry, Covesea Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
The lighthouse accommodation at Covesea is under the ownership of the Covesea Community Trust. This accommodation is ideal for families with small children and situated within the courtyard below the lighthouse tower with a superb sandy beach practically on the doorstep. The beach is accessible via a gate from the lighthouse courtyard. There is a fence surrounding the lighthouse which makes this area safe for young children.
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Accommodation details:

 

Open-plan kitchen/sitting room with breakfast bar, 1 twin and 1 double bedroom, bathroom with bath and separate shower cubicle. Services : electric central heating.

 

Additional information:

 

Parking is available beside the accommodation. Public transport accessible.

 

If you are interested in a larger group/family booking, additional accommodation is available at Halliman Skerry. This neighbouring property can accommodate 4/6 guests.

 

About the property:

 

The Covesea Skerries form a group of small islands and rocks that lie off the Moray coast, 3 miles west of Lossiemouth and 1 mile west of Covesea.

Following the loss of 16 ships during a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826, many applications were made for lighthouses to be established at Tarbat Ness (near Portmahomack on the Dornoch Firth) and Covesea Skerries to mark the wide entrance to the Firth and its confusing series of inlets. Following a lengthy approval was finally received for the building of the lighthouse on Craighead and a beacon on the dangerous Halliman's Scars. Robert Stevenson's son, Alan, designed the new Covesea Skerries lighthouse and beacon. The iron beacon was completed in 1845 and the new lighthouse followed in 1846. Egyptian influences can be seen in the entrance to the tower, the chimneys of the cottages and the arches at the top of the lighthouse tower beneath the balcony.

Like most lighthouses, Covesea Lighthouseis now automatic. However, it once worked by a clockwork mechanism that turned the lenses. A local recounts how the keepers would climb to the top and raise the weights. Covesea is located just opposite the Halliman Skerries. The Skerries are a reef of rocks that are covered at high tide.

 

About the area:

 

The coastal town of Lossiemouth is just over a mile away and can be reached by walking along the lovely beach. It offers the visitor a range of facilities including sea angling, two 18-hole golf courses, stunning unspoilt beaches and wildlife , an excellent range of shopping and quality restaurants and cafés, all making the most of the plentiful supply of fresh seafood. The Silver Sands Holiday Park is just 5 minutes' walk from the lighthouse and here you will find a shop, cafe, bar and a play area for children.

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Halliman Skerry, Covesea Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
The Lighthouse accommodation at Covesea is under the ownership of Covesea Community Trust. Halliman Skerry is a single-storey property in the Covesea Skerries lighthouse complex and is situated in the courtyard below the lighthouse tower. As the entire complex is fully enclosed, this accommodation is great for families with young children who wish to spend a special holiday by the sea. The lighthouse complex is situated on the mainland, just opposite the Halliman Skerries which are a reef of rocks that are covered at high tide. Visitors can also enjoy two superb beaches nearby. One, West Bay, stretches for three miles to the west, beyond the headland housing Covesea Lighthouse.
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Accommodation details:

Sleeps 4/6. Accommodation comprises: sitting room; kitchen with dining room off; 2 twin bedrooms and 1 bedroom with bunk beds (can sleep adults); and bathroom with bath and shower cubicle. Services: electric central heating.

Additional information:

Parking is available beside the accommodation.

If you are interested in a larger group/ family booking, additional accommodation is available at Covesea Skerry. The neighbouring cottage accommodates 4 guests.

About the property:

The Covesea Skerries form a group of small islands and rocks that lie off the Moray coast, 3 miles west of Lossiemouth and 1 mile west of Covesea.

Following the loss of 16 ships during a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826, many applications were made for lighthouses to be established at Tarbat Ness (near Portmahomack on the Dornoch Firth) and Covesea Skerries to mark the wide entrance to the Firth and its confusing series of inlets. Following a lengthy approval was finally received for the building of the lighthouse on Craighead and a beacon on the dangerous Halliman's Scars. Robert Stevenson's son, Alan, designed the new Covesea Skerries lighthouse and beacon. The iron beacon was completed in 1845 and the new lighthouse followed in 1846. Egyptian influences can be seen in the entrance to the tower, the chimneys of the cottages and the arches at the top of the lighthouse tower beneath the balcony.

Like most lighthouses, Covesea Lighthouse is now automatic. However, it once worked by a clockwork mechanism that turned the lenses. A local recounts how the keepers would climb to the top and raise the weights..

About the area:

The coastal town of Lossiemouth is just over a mile away and can be reached by walking along the lovely beach. It offers the visitor a range of facilities including sea angling, stunning unspoilt beaches and wildlife , an excellent range of shopping and quality restaurants and cafes, all making the most of the plentiful supply of fresh seafood. The Silver Sands Holiday Park is just 5 minutes' walk from the lighthouse and here you will find a shop, cafe, bar and a play area for children. Lossiemouth also offers visitors a range of golfing opportunities with its two 18-hole golf courses. < Hide

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Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 1, North Ronaldsay Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Ferocious seas and windswept headlands give these remote Lighthousekeepers' Cottages their wonderful romantic feel. It's easy to imagine the kind of shipwrecks, treasure troves, rescues and skilful seamanship of Robert Louis Stevenson's tales while on North Ronaldsay, and indeed the Lighthouse adjacent to the cottages was designed by his uncle, Alan Stevenson in 1854.
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Inside you'll find it warm and welcoming with an open fire. The cottage is all on one level and designed to be comfortable and accessible for disabled visitors.

 

Accommodation details



  • One storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin


  • Kitchen with dishwasher, microwave and cooker


  • Bathroom with bath only


  • Shared laundry


  • Open fires


  • Oil central heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Fully accessible toilet and shower


 

For larger groups Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 2 can also be booked.

 

About North Ronaldsay's Lighthouses

After a tragic shipwreck in 1740, North Ronaldsay was given one of the first four lighthouses in Scotland. The original Old Beacon was built and first lit in 1789, and shone until 1809 when it was considered redundant. After some years however it was decided that the island's perilous rocks did necessitate their own lighthouse. In 1852 Alan Stevenson recommended builder William Kinghorn of Leith to the Lighthouse Commissioners and the soaring red brick tower you see today was erected, the tallest land-based lighthouse in the British Isles.

 

About the area

Further north than the southern tip of Norway, North Ronaldsay's remoteness has helped to preserve its traditional way of life. The Norn language survived longer here than on any other Orkney isle and you'll find many of the 60 locals have Orcadian surnames that go back for generations. Common grazing on the seashore is still the custom and the local lambs feed off seaweed, giving their meat a rare flavour highly prized by chefs. The vibrant local community (who made the restoration of the Stevenson lighthouse, cottages and Mill possible) will make guests extremely welcome and should your visit coincide with one of the many concerts, dances and social gatherings that take place there, it is not to be missed. Birdwatching tours, island tours and trips up the lighthouse can also be arranged.

 

Things to do



  • 20 metres away from the cottages, the Lighthousekeeper's Office is a great place to learn about North Ronaldsay's maritime history.


  • Dine out at the bird observatory and join in with the bird log that takes place every night. You might spot arctic terns, redthroats, red-backed shrikes and rosefinches.


  • Felted and knitted crafts are available from the island's mill, where wool from the local sheep is processed.


 

Getting there

The houses are open all year round. Fifteen minute flight three times a day from Kirkwall operated by Loganair or a 3-hour ferry trip again from Kirkwall operated by Orkney Ferries. The ferry runs on a Friday, and therefore both properties are available Friday to Friday, though short breaks in the winter will be flexible on arrival and departure days.

 

Please note, during the winter months, guests are advised to fly to the island as opposed to sail as sailings can be disrupted.

 

Food orders can be taken (please give us two weeks notice) and it will be delivered to your fridge for your arrival. This could include local lamb, as well as general groceries.

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