Coastline and Islands

For many of our guests, a holiday just isn't complete without the sea. If you are among them, this selection offers you a choice of delightful properties where the ocean is on your doorstep. Step out of Port Donnel Cottage on to your very own beach on the Solway Firth; experience a long-gone traditional way of life in Beatons Cottage on the shores of the Isle of Skye; or revel in the unique peace and turquoise seas of the Hebridean island of Canna. These are just some of the wonderful properties the National Trust for Scotland has to choose from.
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Craggan Cottage, Balmacara Estate

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
This whitewashed cottage stands on the north shore of Loch Alsh. As if the outstanding coastal views weren't enough, its secluded garden leads directly down to a stony beach where you can enjoy leisurely walks before coming home to a log-burning stove.
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Craggan Cottage has been sensitively furnished with period pieces to keep with its original character. It's also a perfect place to bring your dog. If you fancy heading inland rather than hitting the beach, the woodland walks around Lochalsh go on for miles.

 

Although Wi-Fi is not available at the property you are visiting, there is mobile network coverage provided by O2 & Vodafone which will give you internet access if you have a dongle or appropriate device. Charges for internet access and data usage are available from the network operator. Please note that we do not supply PCs or laptops and that the signal can vary in strength in more remote areas.

Accommodation details



  • 2 storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin on first floor


  • Sitting room with multi-fuel stove


  • Large dining kitchen


  • Bathroom with bath and shower on ground floor


  • Oil-fired central heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Parking available


  • Public transport accessible


 

The cottage is accessed by a narrow track, down which it can be difficult to turn vehicles. Alternative parking is available at the start of the track, about 50 metres from the cottage.

 

Craggan Cottage is only available for full weeks (Saturday to Saturday) throughout the year.

 

For larger families/groups additional accommodation is available at Ferry Cottage, sleeping 4.

 

About Balmacara Estate

Croft land, saltmarsh, lochs and coastline are just some of the varied landscapes you'll discover at Balmacara. The traditional Highland estate covers 2550 hectares and includes the early 19th century village of Plockton, as well as an original 18th century mill house and ice house.

 

About the area

Balmacara Square was the original heart of the estate and lies about a mile away, a cluster of 18th century farm steadings and other buildings. Here you'll find a cafe and visitor centre. For stocking up on supplies head to Kyle of Lochalsh, three miles away, a whitewashed harbour village that looks across to the Isle of Skye.

 

Easy access to the Isle of Skye is now possible by road bridge.

 

Things to do



  • Lochalsh House Policies offer quiet sheltered walks by the lochside among mature Scots pine, oaks and beeches.


  • Spend a day on Skye discovering its culinary delights, including seafood, game and local ale. Stock up on Talisker whisky to enjoy later by the open fire.


  • The Falls of Glomach are just over 12 miles away. For the energetic, this 5 mile hike to one of the highest waterfalls in Britain will reward you with unforgettable views.


 

Getting there

Mainly accessed by A87(T) Inverness to Kyle road but can also be accessed from North by way of the A890 from from Achnasheen and Lochcarron. < Hide

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Ferry Cottage, Balmacara Estate

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Ferry Cottage was once the waiting room for passengers travelling by steamer and sailing boat to and from Balmacara. Situated on a narrow country lane in the small village of Glaick, the one-storey cottage has magnificent coastal views from the master bedroom and sitting room.
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Its historic character has been preserved in the original wall lamps and doors. If you fancy heading inland rather than hitting the beach, the woodland walks around Lochalsh go on for miles.

 

Although Wi-Fi is not available at the property you are visiting, there is mobile network coverage provided by O2 & Vodafone which will give you internet access if you have a dongle or appropriate device. Charges for internet access and data usage are available from the network operator. Please note that we do not supply PCs or laptops and that the signal can vary in strength in more remote areas.

Accommodation details



  • 1 storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 twin, 1 double


  • Farmhouse style kitchen/sitting room


  • Bathroom with bath and shower over bath


  • Night storage heaters


  • Open fire


  • Water heated by immersion


  • Parking available


  • Public transport accessible




Suitable for the less mobile.

 

This accommodation is only available for full weeks (Saturday to Saturday) throughout the year.

 

For larger families/groups additional accommodation is available at Craggan Cottage, sleeping 4.

 

About Balmacara Estate

Croft land, saltmarsh, lochs and coastline are just some of the varied landscapes you'll discover at Balmacara. The traditional Highland estate covers 2550 hectares and includes the early 19th century village of Plockton, as well as an original 18th century mill house and ice house.

 

About the area

Balmacara Square was the original heart of the estate and lies about a mile away, a cluster of 18th century farm steadings and other buildings. Here you'll find a cafe and visitor centre. For stocking up on supplies head to Kyle of Lochalsh, three miles away, a whitewashed harbour village that looks across to the Isle of Skye.

 

Easy access to the Isle of Skye is now possible by road bridge.

 

Things to do



  • Lochalsh House Policies offer quiet sheltered walks by the lochside among mature Scots pine, oaks and beeches.


  • Spend a day on Skye discovering its culinary delights including seafood, game and local ale. Stock up on Talisker whisky to enjoy later by the open fire.


  • The Falls of Glomach are just over 12 miles away. For the energetic, this 5 mile hike to one of the highest waterfalls in Britain will reward you with unforgettable views.


 

Getting there

Mainly accessed by A87(T) Inverness to Kyle road but can also be accessed from North by way of the A890 from from Achnasheen and Lochcarron. < Hide

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Belmont House, Belmont House

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 8
  • 5
  • Not allowed
On the UK's most northerly island this slice of Georgian grandeur stands perfectly proportioned, overlooking the Bluemull Sound that runs between Yell and Unst. Belmont House has been exquisitely restored to show off all the features of its age; pavilions, symmetrical frontage, arched hallways and quadrant walls.
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The House was built by Thomas Mouat in 1775 and now provides spacious and splendid accommodation for up to 12 people. Make the most of the magnificent first-floor drawing room or relax in Mouat's writing room with its Venetian windows that look out to sea.

 

Accommodation details



  • 3 storeys


  • Sleeps 8 - 12 - 1 double, 3 twin, plus additional sofa bed and two hand-built box beds suitable for children


  • Hand-built kitchen with range


  • Large dining room


  • Family room


  • Shower room and WC


  • First-floor drawing room with views to three sides


  • Thomas Mouat's writing room


  • Large child friendly garden


  • Laundry


 

A large child-friendly garden runs from the front of the house down to the pier at Belmont, where the ferry from Yell docks.

 

There is mobile reception (Vodaphone) and broadband at the property.

 

About Unst

Unst is the most northerly of the Shetland Isles, just 12 miles long by 5 miles wide, outlined by majestic cliffs, ragged sea stacks, sheltered inlets, and golden beaches. Inland, purebred Shetland sheep and ponies roam the common grazing land. Unst is a major breeding site for seabirds including gannets, puffins, guillemots, razorbills, arctic skuas and whimbrels. Seals and porpoises are common and you may even see otters and killer whales. Try the following websites for more information:

www.shetland.org

www.unst.org

 

Things to do



  • Hermaness National Nature reserve is excellent for birdwatching. You'll find rare plants at Keen of Hamar, as well as sea and loch angling. The Trust can arrange guided walks, fishing trips, and tours of the island.


  • Indulge in the local ingredients. Local lamb and shellfish can be ordered, and there is also a Farmer's Market once a month.


  • The Unst Viking project has been unearthing Norse finds all over the island. Visit their reconstructed Longhouse and ship at Haroldswick.


 

Getting there

Although Unst is as far north as southern Greenland, it is a very accessible island. Smooth, modern roads and frequent vehicle ferries link the Shetland mainland to Unst via the neighbouring island of Yell. The ferries are very busy in summer and it is advisable to book in advance (Tel: 01957 722259).

 

Loganair flies from Aberdeen, Belfast, Benbecula, Birmingham, Campbeltown, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Exeter, Glasgow, Guernsey, Isle of Man, Jersey, Leeds/Bradford, Kirkwall, London (Gatwick), Manchester, Manston (Kent), Newquay, Norwich, Southampton to Sumburgh Airport on the Southern tip of mainland Shetland. < Hide

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Shore Lodge Bunkhouse, Brodick Castle

  • Dates Available
  •  None
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 14
  • 4
  • Not allowed
Situated in the grounds of Brodick Castle on the Isle of Arran, Shore Lodge Bunkhouse provides comfortable accommodation for groups of up to 14 guests. Read More >
Accommodation is available for short breaks of Mon-Fri (4 nights) or Fri-Mon (3 nights). Full weeks of either Mon-Mon or Fri-Fri (7 nights) are also available. Bookings are only available for the whole lodge (all 14 beds).

 

Accommodation details



  • Single storey


  • Sleeps 14 - 4 bedrooms with bunk beds (two 2-bedded, one 4-bedded and one 6-bedded).


  • Sitting room with wood-burning stove


  • Fully equipped kitchen and dining room.


  • Drying room


  • 4 WCs with wash basins


  • 3 showers


  • Electric central heating


  • Free Wi-Fi available in bunkhouse.


  •  

    We regret dogs are not permitted in the bunkhouse. < Hide

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Blue Door, Broughton House

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 7
  • 4
  • Dogs allowed
Beamed ceilings and pale walls set off this cosy artists' retreat, which stands on the same cobbled wynd on which stained-glass artist E A Taylor and his wife, illustrator Jessie M King used to live. Kirkcudbright is known at 'The Artists Town' having hosted generations of painters, craftmakers and artisans, a culture still thriving today.
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The cottage has its own private garden at the bottom of the close with views across the dolls-house rooftops of this distinctive picturesque town.

 

Although Wi-Fi is not available at the property you are visiting, there is mobile network coverage provided by all major networks which will give you internet access if you have a dongle or appropriate device. Charges for internet access and data usage are available from the network operator. Please note that we do not supply PCs or laptops and that the signal can vary in strength in more remote areas. 

Accommodation details



  • 3 storey


  • Sleeps 7 - 2 twin, 1 double (with ensuite wash basin and WC), 1 single


  • Sitting room


  • Kitchen with dining area


  • Wet room with WC


  • Bathroom with bath and shower


  • Gas central heating


 

Public transport accessible. Free parking is available on the street outside Greengate Close.

 

About Blue Door

The Blue Door is one of several cottages in historic Greengate Close and the cottages are still referred to by their original names, which relate to the colour of their doors, such as "Yellow Door", "Red Door" and "Blue Door".

Greengate House and these cottages were owned in the first half of the 20th century by Glasgow Girl artist Jessie M King and her husband, artist E A Taylor. Jessie M King would invite her woman artist friends and students to come and stay and use the Blue Door as lodging/studio space.

 

About Broughton House

At the heart of Kirkcudbright stand the peachy-pink walls of 18th-century Broughton House & Garden, a Trust property that was home to 'Glasgow Boys' artist E A Hornel, from 1901 to 1933. As well as Hornel's delicate Japanese-influenced paintings the museum houses a major Robert Burns collection.

 

About Kirkcudbright

Dorothy L Sayers once said, "In Kirkcudbright one either fishes or paints....". The Royal Burgh, established in 1455, lies on an estuary of the River Dee, making it as famous for its catches as for its art. Fresh fish is available Tuesday to Saturday from the Fresh Fish Shop just off the Harbour Square. Close by, Dhoon's sandy beach is a perfect place for children to paddle.

 

Things to do



  • Take a wander down the High Street to numbers 115 & 117, which have been called 'the closest approximation to a dolls' house you are ever likely to see in real life'.


  • Rockcliffe village is just over 20 miles away. Here you'll find swathes of pebbled coastlines, a bird sanctuary and the Mote of Mark, the ruined court of a Dark Ages chieftan.


  • A visit to nearby Threave estate will keep you busy for the whole day. This baronial house has its own sculpture garden and nature reserve, famous as a hotspot for spying bats.


 

Getting there

Kirkcudbright is located off the A711 and A755. Dumfries is 28 miles away and Castle Douglas 9 miles.

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Covesea Skerry, Covesea Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
The lighthouse accommodation at Covesea is under the ownership of the Covesea Lighthouse Community Company Ltd. This accommodation is ideal for families with small children and situated within the courtyard below the lighthouse tower with a superb sandy beach practically on the doorstep. The beach is accessible via a gate from the lighthouse courtyard. There is a fence surrounding the lighthouse which makes this area safe for young children.
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Accommodation details:

 

Open-plan kitchen/sitting room with breakfast bar, 1 twin and 1 double bedroom, bathroom with bath and separate shower cubicle. Services : electric central heating.

 

Additional information:

 

Parking is available beside the accommodation. Public transport accessible.

 

If you are interested in a larger group/family booking, additional accommodation is available at Halliman Skerry. This neighbouring property can accommodate 4/6 guests.

 

About the property:

 

The Covesea Skerries form a group of small islands and rocks that lie off the Moray coast, 3 miles west of Lossiemouth and 1 mile west of Covesea.

 

Following the loss of 16 ships during a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826, many applications were made for lighthouses to be established at Tarbat Ness (near Portmahomack on the Dornoch Firth) and Covesea Skerries to mark the wide entrance to the Firth and its confusing series of inlets.

 

Following a lengthy process, approval was finally received for the building of the lighthouse on Craighead and a beacon on the dangerous Halliman's Scars. Robert Stevenson's son, Alan, designed the new Covesea Skerries lighthouse and beacon. The iron beacon was completed in 1845 and the new lighthouse followed in 1846. Egyptian influences can be seen in the entrance to the tower, the chimneys of the cottages and the arches at the top of the lighthouse tower beneath the balcony.

 

Covesea Lighthouse was manned until 1984 when automation meant that the keepers were no longer required and the switching on and off of the lamp could be done remotely from the Northern Lighthouse Board headquarters in Edinburgh. With the advent of new technology, the addition of a North Cardinal Buoy next to the Halliman Skerries allowed the lamp to be switched off in 2012.

 

Covesea Lighthouse is open for pre-booked guided tours. For opening times and and bookings please contact info@covesealighthouse.co.uk or telephone 01343 810 664. Whilst groups will be welcome, access to the tower is limited to 8 people at a time.

 

Covesea is located just opposite the Halliman Skerries. The Skerries are a reef of rocks that are covered at high tide.

 

About the area:

 

The coastal town of Lossiemouth is just over a mile away and can be reached by walking along the lovely beach. It offers the visitor a range of facilities including sea angling, two 18-hole golf courses, stunning unspoilt beaches and wildlife , an excellent range of shopping and quality restaurants and cafés, all making the most of the plentiful supply of fresh seafood. The Silver Sands Holiday Park is just 5 minutes' walk from the lighthouse and here you will find a shop, cafe, bar and a play area for children.

Covesea is 1 mile from Lossiemouth, on the A941 from Elgin (7 miles)

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Halliman Skerry, Covesea Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
The Lighthouse accommodation at Covesea is under the ownership of Covesea Lighthouse Community Company Ltd. Halliman Skerry is a single-storey property in the Covesea Skerries lighthouse complex and is situated in the courtyard below the lighthouse tower. As the entire complex is fully enclosed, this accommodation is great for families with young children who wish to spend a special holiday by the sea.
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The lighthouse complex is situated on the mainland, just opposite the Halliman Skerries which are a reef of rocks that are covered at high tide. Visitors can also enjoy two superb beaches nearby. One, West Bay, stretches for three miles to the west, beyond the headland housing Covesea Lighthouse.

 

Accommodation details:

 

Sleeps 4/6. Accommodation comprises: sitting room; kitchen with dining room off; 2 twin bedrooms and 1 bedroom with bunk beds (can sleep adults); and bathroom with bath and shower cubicle. Services: electric central heating.

 

Additional information:

 

Parking is available beside the accommodation.

 

If you are interested in a larger group/ family booking, additional accommodation is available at Covesea Skerry. The neighbouring cottage accommodates 4 guests.

 

About the property:

 

The Covesea Skerries form a group of small islands and rocks that lie off the Moray coast, 3 miles west of Lossiemouth and 1 mile west of Covesea.

 

Following the loss of 16 ships during a storm in the Moray Firth in November 1826, many applications were made for lighthouses to be established at Tarbat Ness (near Portmahomack on the Dornoch Firth) and Covesea Skerries to mark the wide entrance to the Firth and its confusing series of inlets.

 

Following a lengthy process, approval was finally received for the building of the lighthouse on Craighead and a beacon on the dangerous Halliman's Scars. Robert Stevenson's son, Alan, designed the new Covesea Skerries lighthouse and beacon. The iron beacon was completed in 1845 and the new lighthouse followed in 1846. Egyptian influences can be seen in the entrance to the tower, the chimneys of the cottages and the arches at the top of the lighthouse tower beneath the balcony.

 

Covesea Lighthouse was manned until 1984 when automation meant that the keepers were no longer required and the switching on and off of the lamp could be done remotely from the Northern Lighthouse Board headquarters in Edinburgh. With the advent of new technology, the addition of a North Cardinal Buoy next to the Halliman Skerries allowed the lamp to be switched off in 2012.

 

Covesea Lighthouse is open for pre-booked guided tours. For opening times and and bookings please contact info@covesealighthouse.co.uk or telephone 01343 810 664. Whilst groups will be welcome, access to the tower is limited to 8 people at a time.

 

About the area:

 

The coastal town of Lossiemouth is just over a mile away and can be reached by walking along the lovely beach. It offers the visitor a range of facilities including sea angling, stunning unspoilt beaches and wildlife , an excellent range of shopping and quality restaurants and cafes, all making the most of the plentiful supply of fresh seafood. The Silver Sands Holiday Park is just 5 minutes' walk from the lighthouse and here you will find a shop, cafe, bar and a play area for children. Lossiemouth also offers visitors a range of golfing opportunities with its two 18-hole golf courses. < Hide

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Lydia Cottage, Cromarty

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 2
  • 1
  • Dogs allowed
This traditional Cromarty cottage was built around 1911 on the site of Cromarty's former fire station. Fully refurbished with modern creature comforts it provides a spacious base for two people to explore the wildlife and history at the heart of this Black Isle town.
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The cottage lies in Cromarty's Fishertown area, once populated by herring fishers and close enough to hear the waves lapping against the shores of the Cromarty Firth. An enclosed garden with a picnic table is perfect for summer barbeques.

 

Accommodation details



  • 2 storeys - detached cottage


  • Sleeps 2 - 1 twin


  • Sitting room


  • Kitchen with dining area


  • Shower room with double shower


  • Open fire


  • Electric storage heaters


  • Immersion water heating


  • Parking available at eastern gable end of cottage - not reserved but usually available


  • Public transport accessible




The first floor is accessed by a spiral staircase and is not suitable for anyone with mobility issues.

 

About the area

Cromarty has plenty to enchant both travellers and holidaymakers: sandy beaches, Georgian architecture, bottlenose dolphins, and bird colonies of international importance. It first became a Royal Burgh in the 13th century. In the 1700s salt-fish processing and sea-trade helped to swell the town's economy, and many of its famous merchants' houses date from this era.

 

Cromarty is only 40 minutes' drive from Inverness, the "capital of the Highlands".

 

Things to do



  • Visit the birthplace of Hugh Miller. Miller was a stonemason, geologist and writer, whose thatched cottage is now a museum with a colourful garden of native plants.


  • Climb the 'Hundred steps' to South Sutor, accessed via the Reeds Park Path along the shore at the east end of town. The Sutors are rocks on either side of the firth thought once to be the abode of two giant shoemakers.


  • You'll be less than an hour's drive from Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.




 

Getting there

Cromarty is 22 miles north-east of Inverness. From the Kessock Bridge in Inverness, follow the A9 north until signs for A832 to Cromarty. < Hide

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Paye House, Cromarty

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
18th-century Paye House lies at the heart of Cromarty's historic conservation area, surrounded by cobbled lanes and listed buildings. Its first recorded owner was the keeper of the County Gaol who also ran an alehouse. In later years it served as one of the town's hubs as a general store, a doctors' surgery, a chip shop and a depot for antique toys.
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Enjoy the Cromarty sunsets from the garden patio, make the most of the area's fine local ingredients on the kitchen's Rayburn and come home to a roaring open fire after walks around town.

 

Accommodation details



  • 2 storeys


  • Sleeps 6 - 2 doubles, 1 twin


  • Sitting room with open fire


  • Kitchen


  • Dining room/study area


  • Bathroom with bath and shower over bath


  • WC with wash basin


  • Garden with patio


  • Oil fired central heating


  • Free parking on Church Street, around the corner




 

About the area

Cromarty has plenty to enchant both travellers and holidaymakers: sandy beaches, Georgian architecture, bottlenose dolphins, and bird colonies of international importance. It first became a Royal Burgh in the 13th century. In the 1700s salt-fish processing and sea-trade helped to swell the town's economy, and many of its famous merchants' houses date from this era.

 

Cromarty is only 40 minutes' drive from Inverness, the "capital of the Highlands".

 

Things to do



  • Visit the birthplace of Hugh Miller. Miller was a stonemason, geologist and writer, whose thatched cottage is now a museum with a colourful garden of native plants.


  • Climb the 'Hundred steps' to South Sutor, accessed via the Reeds Park Path along the shore at the east end of town. The Sutors are rocks on either side of the firth thought once to be the abode of two giant shoemakers.


  • You'll be less than an hour's drive from Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.




 

Getting there

Cromarty is 22 miles north-east of Inverness. From the Kessock Bridge in Inverness, follow the A9 north until signs for A832 to Cromarty.

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Crovie Cottage, Crovie

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Aberdeen & Grampian
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
This cosy, restored traditional fishing cottage dates from a time when the sea was the only mode of transport to and from Scotland's shores, and provided the livelihood for coastal communities. Perched on Crovie's unusual seashore rocky shelf the sitting room windows look out to the bay, enclosed north and south by magnificent cliffs.
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17th century wood panelling and an open fire complete Crovie Cottage's old sea dog charm. In the summertime, take to the private garden and make use of the cottage's barbeque.

 

Accommodation details



  • 2 storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 single, 1 box bed in sitting room


  • Sitting/dining room with sea view and open fire


  • Shower room


  • Kitchen


  • Private garden with patio and barbeque


  • WiFi


  • Fitted electric Dimplex heating


 

...Our guests said...

"...more and more reluctant to venture away from Crovie, preferring to sit in front of the cottage and watch the changing seascape and tides, the coming & going of fishing boats, and the glorious sunsets".

 

About the area

Crovie is a unique place, a conservation village created on a seashore ledge so narrow it has only enough room for the cottages built on it and a small footpath. The cliffs that stretch above it form the east side of Gamrie Bay; on the other side of the village is the sea.

 

Crovie comprises around 50 fishing cottages, most of which date back 150 years or more, and is one of the best preserved fishing villages in Europe. A pebble beach to the west end of the winding path leads to the next village, Gardenstown, one mile away. Look out for bottlenosed dolphins along the way.

 

Things to do



  • Sample Cullen Skink in the town it hails from. The traditional smoked haddock soup is a hearty winter warmer. Cullen village is just over 20 miles away.


  • Tee off in one of the area's 50 nearby golf courses, and re-charge your batteries afterwards in Gardenstown's 18th century inn.


  • See how the other half lived at Fyvie Castle, just over 25 miles away. Sculpted turrets and fine tapestries give the castle a fairytale feel and it is steeped in local legends and myths.


 

Getting there

From Banff head through Macduff on A98 towards Fraserburgh. 0.50 mile after Macduff take B9031 left turn Gardenstown. 8 miles later take Crovie turn to left.

 

This cottage is privately owned. Please note that bookings are restricted to full weeks only (Saturday to Saturday), short breaks are not available at this property. The entry time to the cottage is from 5pm onwards on day of arrival. Parking is available for residents and their guests at the north-west end of the village. Parking in high season can require skill and patience. If the lower car park alongside the village is full, there is additional parking on the road to the village - luggage can be off-loaded at the bottom and taken by wheelbarrow (stored in the back garden). < Hide

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Ardlochan Lodge, Culzean Castle

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Situated just a stones throw from the golden beach at Maidens on the Culzean coast in Ayrshire is this pretty little lodge house - the last remaining gate house on the Culzean Castle & Country Park estate.
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Recently modernised and renovated to a high standard, Ardlochan Lodge will open April 2016.

 

Accommodation details



  • Single storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double and 1 twin bedroom (can be converted to double if required)


  • Sitting room with wood-burning stove


  • Under floor heating


  • Open plan kitchen, with patio doors leading to patio area and spacious garden


  • Bathroom with shower over bath


  • Parking adjacent to cottage




 

About Culzean Castle

Monumental, romantic and splendid, Culzean Castle was designed by Robert Adam in the 1770s on one of Scotland's most dramatic clifftop sites. The Armoury, the Library, the famous crimson oval staircase; all are guaranteed to leave a lasting impression.

 

228 hectares (565 acres) of Country Park surrounding the castle offer a variety of countryside to explore, including clifftop and woodland walks.

 

About the area

Maybole is the closest town, an ancient village established in the 12th century. As well as a Victorian town hall and a 17th century castle, the High Street has a range of shops and amenities.

 

Ayrshire is famous for its golf courses including Turnberry, Royal Troon and Old Prestwick. Fishing, cycling, horse riding and clay shooting are also available nearby.

 

Things to do



  • Spend a day losing yourself in Culzean's massive grounds. Spot the Ice House, the Swan Pond, visit the Deer Park and adopt a deer, or explore the rock pools on the beach.


  • Alloway is only a short drive away. Learn about Scotland's National Bard at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, then follow in the footsteps of Tam O'Shanter and visit Alloway's 'auld haunted kirk'.


  • There's not much left to see, but the nearby clifftop ruin of Turnberry Castle is steeped in medieval history. It's said Robert the Bruce's mother held his father captive here until he agreed to marry her, and the castle is widely held as King Robert's birthplace. The ruin is old and unstable; take great care if exploring.




Getting there

Culzean is 12 miles south of Ayr, 4 miles west of Maybole.

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Brewhouse Flat, Culzean Castle & Country Park

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 4
  • 2
  • Not allowed
Perched on an Ayrshire clifftop, Culzean Castle is second to none for grandeur. This circular former brewhouse lies in the castle's West Wing and supplied the estate workers with their staple drink of beer until Victorian times.
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The brewery was added to Culzean in the 1780s. 100 years later however the 3rd Marquess of Ailsa decided to make way for his preferred tipple and changed it into a wine cellar.

 

Dine alfresco in the private garden, enjoy spectacular sunsets over the bay and let the crash of the waves lull you to sleep.

 

Accommodation details



  • One storey basement flat - 23 steps down to the flat which we regret is not suitable for anyone with mobility issues.


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double (can be converted to twin), 1 twin


  • Sitting/dining room


  • Kitchen


  • Bathroom with shower over bath


  • Electric night storage heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Private garden


  • Children will require supervision when playing outside the flat, due to the cliff edge


  • Private parking for 2 cars


  • Public transport accessible




 

About Culzean Castle

Monumental, romantic and splendid, Culzean Castle was designed by Robert Adam in the 1770s on one of Scotland's most dramatic clifftop sites. The Armoury, the Library, the famous crimson oval staircase; all are guaranteed to leave a lasting impression.

 

228 hectares (565 acres) of Country Park surrounding the castle offer a variety of countryside to explore, including clifftop and woodland walks.

 

About the area

Maybole is the closest town, an ancient village established in the 12th century. As well as a Victorian town hall and a 17th century castle, the High Street has a range of shops and amenities.

 

Ayrshire is famous for its golf courses including Turnberry, Royal Troon and Old Prestwick. Fishing, cycling, horse riding and clay shooting are also available nearby.

 

Things to do



  • Spend a day losing yourself in Culzean's massive grounds. Spot the Ice House, the Swan Pond, visit the Deer Park and adopt a deer, or explore the rock pools on the beach.


  • Alloway is only a short drive away. Learn about Scotland's National Bard at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, then follow in the footsteps of Tam O'Shanter and visit Alloway's 'auld haunted kirk'.


  • There's not much left to see, but the nearby clifftop ruin of Turnberry Castle is steeped in medieval history. It's said Robert the Bruce's mother held his father captive here until he agreed to marry her, and the castle is widely held as King Robert's birthplace. The ruin is old and unstable; take great care if exploring.




Getting there

Culzean is 12 miles south of Ayr, 4 miles west of Maybole. < Hide

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North Segganwell, Culzean Castle & Country Park

  • Dates Available
  • 2 Star Good
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 4
  • 1
  • Dogs allowed
Tucked beneath the castle cliffs and opening out onto the beach, Culzean's two Segganwell Cottages make great seashore hideaways for families with children.
Read More >
Simple and comfortable, these estate cottages are a reminder of the number of people it took to keep the castle and grounds in splendour throughout the year. William Kirkland, a Shepherd lived here with his wife and four children, two of whom were gardeners.

 

Accommodation details



  • 1 storey - reached by a steep stairway of over 100 steps and not suitable for less mobile people


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, with additional bunk beds in recess


  • Sitting/dining room with wood burning stove


  • Kitchen


  • Shower room with WC


  • Laundry facilities in an outbuilding


  • Night storage heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Parking for 2 cars at top of steps




Please bring a torch for night time

Additional apartments are available at Culzean. An interlinking door leads to South Segganwell Cottage which can be unlocked if both cottages are booked.

 

About Culzean Castle

Monumental, romantic and splendid, Culzean Castle was designed by Robert Adam in the 1770s on one of Scotland's most dramatic clifftop sites. The Armoury, the Library, the famous crimson oval staircase; all are guaranteed to leave a lasting impression.

 

228 hectares (565 acres) of Country Park surrounding the castle offer a variety of countryside to explore, including clifftop and woodland walks.

 

About the area

Maybole is the closest town, an ancient village established in the 12th century. As well as a Victorian town hall and 17th century castle, the High Street has a range of shops and amenities.

 

Ayrshire is famous for its golf courses including Turnberry, Royal Troon and Old Prestwick. Fishing, cycling, horse riding and clay shooting are also available nearby.

 

Things to do



  • Spend a day losing yourself in Culzean's massive grounds. Spot the Ice House, the Swan Pond, visit the Deer Park and adopt a deer, or explore the rock pools on the beach.


  • Alloway is only a short drive away. Learn about Scotland's National Bard at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, then follow in the footsteps of Tam O'Shanter and visit Alloway's 'auld haunted kirk'.


  • There's not much left to see, but nearby clifftop ruin Turnberry Castle is steeped in medieval history. It's said Robert the Bruce's mother held his father captive here until he agreed to marry her, and the castle is widely held to be King Robert's birthplace. The ruin is old and unstable; take great care if exploring.




Getting there

Culzean is 12 miles south of Ayr, 4 miles west of Maybole.

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Royal Artillery Cottage, Culzean Castle & Country Park

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Set at the heart of Culzean Castle's sandstone stable block, this cottage would originally have served as living quarters for the numerous grooms, coachmen and stable-boys in charge of the Marquess's horses.
Read More >
Its clifftop aspect gives it fine sea views across to Arran. Wheelchair users and less able-bodied guests will find the flat particularly comfortable. All on one level, it has sliding doors, and a ramped entrance. The cottage was endowed by the Royal Artillery after WWII for the use of disabled ex-servicemen.

 

Accommodation details



  • 1 storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double (can be converted to twin on request), 1 twin


  • Sitting/dining room


  • Kitchen


  • Bathroom with bath and wheel-in shower


  • Gas fired under floor central heating and hot water


  • Car parking for 2 cars opposite cottage.




Additional apartments are available at Culzean.

 

About Culzean Castle

Monumental, romantic and splendid, Culzean Castle was designed by Robert Adam in the 1770s on one of Scotland's most dramatic clifftop sites. The Armoury, the Library, the famous crimson oval staircase; all are guaranteed to leave a lasting impression.

 

228 hectares (565 acres) of Country Park surrounding the castle offer a variety of countryside to explore, including clifftop and woodland walks.

 

About the area

Maybole is the closest town, an ancient village established in the 12th century. As well as a Victorian town hall and 17th century castle, the High Street has a range of shops and amenities.

 

Ayrshire is famous for its golf courses including Turnberry, Royal Troon and Old Prestwick. Fishing, cycling, horse riding and clay shooting are also available nearby.

 

Things to do



  • Spend a day losing yourself in Culzean's massive grounds. Spot the Ice House, the Swan Pond, visit the Deer Park and adopt a deer, or explore the rock pools on the beach.


  • Alloway is only a short drive away. Learn about Scotland's National Bard at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, then follow in the footsteps of Tam O'Shanter and visit Alloway's 'auld haunted kirk'.


  • There's not much left to see, but nearby clifftop ruin Turnberry Castle is steeped in medieval history. It's said Robert the Bruce's mother held his father captive here until he agreed to marry her, and the castle is widely held to be King Robert's birthplace. The ruin is old and unstable; take great care if exploring.




Getting there

Culzean is 12 miles south of Ayr, 4 miles west of Maybole.

Please note that this property will be let Friday to Friday between 19 March and 29 October. Short breaks of either Monday to Friday or Friday - Monday will be available over the winter months. < Hide

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South Segganwell, Culzean Castle & Country Park

  • Dates Available
  • 2 Star Good
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 4
  • 1
  • Dogs allowed
Like it's counterpart, North Segganwell, this cottage lies directly beneath the castle cliffs, opening onto the beach. Thomas Davidson, the house carter, once lived at South Segganwell with his wife and 6 children.
Read More >
Simple and comfortable, these estate cottages are a reminder of the number of people it took to keep the castle and grounds in splendour throughout the year.

 

Accommodation details



  • 1 storey - reached by a steep stairway of over 100 steps and not suitable for less mobile people


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, with additional bunk beds in recess


  • Sitting/dining room with wood burning stove


  • Kitchen


  • Shower room with WC


  • Laundry facilities in an outbuilding


  • Night storage heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Parking for 2 cars at top of steps




Please bring a torch for night time

Additional apartments are available at Culzean. An interlinking door leads to South Segganwell Cottage which can be unlocked if both cottages are booked.

 

About Culzean Castle

Monumental, romantic and splendid, Culzean Castle was designed by Robert Adam in the 1770s on one of Scotland's most dramatic clifftop sites. The Armoury, the Library, the famous crimson oval staircase; all are guaranteed to leave a lasting impression.

 

228 hectares (565 acres) of Country Park surrounding the castle offer a variety of countryside to explore, including clifftop and woodland walks.

 

About the area

Maybole is the closest town, an ancient village established in the 12th century. As well as a Victorian town hall and 17th century castle, the High Street has a range of shops and amenities.

 

Ayrshire is famous for its golf courses including Turnberry, Royal Troon and Old Prestwick. Fishing, cycling, horse riding and clay shooting are also available nearby.

 

Things to do



  • Spend a day losing yourself in Culzean's massive grounds. Spot the Ice House, the Swan Pond, visit the Deer Park and adopt a deer, or explore the rock pools on the beach.


  • Alloway is only a short drive away. Learn about Scotland's National Bard at the Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, then follow in the footsteps of Tam O'Shanter and visit Alloway's 'auld haunted kirk'.


  • There's not much left to see, but nearby clifftop ruin Turnberry Castle is steeped in medieval history. It's said Robert the Bruce's mother held his father captive here until he agreed to marry her, and the castle is widely held to be King Robert's birthplace. The ruin is old and unstable; take great care if exploring.




Getting there

Culzean is 12 miles south of Ayr, 4 miles west of Maybole. < Hide

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Garden Lodge, Inverewe Garden

  • Dates Available
  • 4 Star Excellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 6
  • 3
  • Not allowed
Osgood Mackenzie, the man who created the horticultural Shangri-la of Inverewe Gardens, spent his final years living in this bright spacious lodge. With views of eucalyptus, Chinese lantern flowers and Californian lilac trailing down to the shores of Loch Ewe, Garden Lodge is an intoxicatingly beautiful place to relax among hundreds of rare and exotic plants.
Read More >
You'll have free run of the gardens after sunset when they are deserted, or first thing in the morning when the light is perfect. The cottage is furnished in contemporary Scottish style.

 

. 

Accommodation details



  • 1 storey


  • Sleeps 6 - 1 double and 2 twin bedroom


  • Sitting room with wood burning stove and dining table


  • Kitchen with dining area


  • Bathroom


  • Shower room


  • Oil-fired central heating


  • Private garden


  • Parking available


 

With effect from 31 October 2015, the property will sleep 6. There will be 3 bedrooms - 1 double and 2 twins.

 

About Inverewe Gardens

Osgood Mackenzie's plan to create a 54-acre garden from windswept moorland on a rocky peninsula beside Loch Ewe raised a few eyebrows in its day. His vision is still astonishing today, with some of the worlds largest growing trees planted into holes hewn out of the bedrock, nurtured by the warm currents of the North Atlantic Drift. In 2009, Inverewe's gardeners were delighted to introduce the world's most northerly planting of eight Wollemi Pines. A three mile network of paths weaves around the garden, and the surrounding landscape is rich with wildlife and spectacular views.

 

About the area

With glassy lochs, paths carving through moorland and vast beaches this corner of Wester Ross is a place to reconnect with nature. Poolewe is the nearest village, within walking distance from the lodge, with a hotel restaurant, a weekly market, and a post office. Gairloch lies 6 miles away; the butchers shop is a good place to stock up on local game, eggs and sausages.

 

Things to do



  • Take advantage of the gardens at dusk when they come alive with scents (don't forget your midge repellent!) or get up early for an alfresco breakfast on the lawn and photograph the opening buds.


  • Try the generous seafood platters at the Fish Box Bar in Gairloch then walk off your indulgence on the stony beach that looks across to the Isle of Skye.


  • There are a number of walks round the estate and further afield where you may bump into pine martins, buzzards or even stags.


 

Getting there

The Inverewe Estate is off the A832 by Poolewe, 6 miles from Gairloch. Achnasheen is the nearest railway station, 35 miles away. D&E Coaches offer a connection during high season (01463 222 444). Westerbus run a connection from Inverness to Poolewe Mon - Sat all year (01445 712 255).

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Beaton's Croft, Isle of Skye

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 2
  • 1
  • Dogs allowed
There is no better place from which to explore the enchanting Isle of Skye than an original thatched cottage. 'A'-listed for its historic importance, and nestled in a landscape of rolling hills and Hebridean views, Beaton's Croft is a dream hideaway from everyday life.
Read More >
Come home to a wood-burning stove after long walks and soak up the atmosphere of traditional croft life mixed with modern amenities.

 

Although Wi-Fi is not available at the property you are visiting, there is mobile network coverage provided by Vodafone & O2 which will give you internet access if you have a dongle or appropriate device. Charges for internet access and data usage are available from the network operator. Please note that we do not supply PCs or laptops and that the signal can vary in strength in more remote areas.

Accommodation details



  • single storey


  • Sleeps 2 - 1 twin


  • Sitting room with wood-burning stove


  • Kitchen


  • Shower room with WC


  • Night storage heaters


  • Electric water heater


  • Parking available at rear of cottage


  • Public transport accessible


 

Only full weeks (Saturday to Saturday) available.

 

About Beaton's Croft

Beaton's Croft lies in the township of Bornesketaig at the north end of Skye. In the late 19th century it was built and then occupied as one of a row of four by the four Gillies brothers. Bornesketaig at that time was known as Pennicille and was most likely established as a settlement by the old church, now a ruin which stands above the township. Superb views across to the Isles of Harris, Lewis and North Uist are the icing on the cake of this authentic historic croft.

 

About the area

Skye combines spectacular mountains, views to make the heart soar, and a rich heritage of historically significant events to enthral visitors of any age, from every part of the world.

 

The awe-inspiring peaks of the Cuillin mountains rise at the centre and provide some of the most challenging walking and climbing in Britain. Seafood is abundant and world-class cuisine is available at the famous Three Chimneys restaurant. In Portree, just over 20 miles away you'll find most amenities. Kilmuir is the burial site for Flora MacDonald, who escorted Bonnie Prince Charlie 'over the sea to Skye', while Dunvegan Castle holds more than 800 years of dramatic island history within its walls.

 

Things to do



  • Stock up on Talisker whisky from the local distillery, then enjoy a picnic on the beach at nearby Talisker Bay, where it's said the Irish Giant Cuillin once waded ashore to do battle.


  • Hike up to the entrancing peaks of the Quiraing. The unusual mountain shapes were formed by a series of landslips. Look out for 'the needle', 'the table' and 'the prison'.


  • The Whitewave Outdoor Centre offers kayaking, windsurfing, archery and guided walks to make the most of Skye's landscape.


 

Getting there

After crossing the Skye bridge, at Kyleakin Roundabout take the 3rd exit onto the A87 for

Portree, Uig. Join the A87, then take the A855 for Staffin. Bornesketaig will be on your left. < Hide

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Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 1, North Ronaldsay Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Ferocious seas and windswept headlands give these remote Lighthousekeepers' Cottages their wonderful romantic feel. It's easy to imagine the kind of shipwrecks, treasure troves, rescues and skilful seamanship of Robert Louis Stevenson's tales while on North Ronaldsay, and indeed the Lighthouse adjacent to the cottages was designed by his uncle, Alan Stevenson in 1854.
Read More >
Inside you'll find it warm and welcoming with an open fire. The cottage is all on one level and designed to be comfortable and accessible for disabled visitors.

 

Accommodation details



  • One storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin


  • Kitchen with dishwasher, microwave and cooker


  • Bathroom with bath only


  • Shared laundry


  • Open fires


  • Oil central heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Fully accessible toilet and shower


 

For larger groups Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 2 can also be booked.

 

About North Ronaldsay's Lighthouses

After a tragic shipwreck in 1740, North Ronaldsay was given one of the first four lighthouses in Scotland. The original Old Beacon was built and first lit in 1789, and shone until 1809 when it was considered redundant. After some years however it was decided that the island's perilous rocks did necessitate their own lighthouse. In 1852 Alan Stevenson recommended builder William Kinghorn of Leith to the Lighthouse Commissioners and the soaring red brick tower you see today was erected, the tallest land-based lighthouse in the British Isles.

 

About the area

Further north than the southern tip of Norway, North Ronaldsay's remoteness has helped to preserve its traditional way of life. The Norn language survived longer here than on any other Orkney isle and you'll find many of the 60 locals have Orcadian surnames that go back for generations. Common grazing on the seashore is still the custom and the local lambs feed off seaweed, giving their meat a rare flavour highly prized by chefs. The vibrant local community (who made the restoration of the Stevenson lighthouse, cottages and Mill possible) will make guests extremely welcome and should your visit coincide with one of the many concerts, dances and social gatherings that take place there, it is not to be missed. Birdwatching tours, island tours and trips up the lighthouse can also be arranged.

 

Things to do



  • 20 metres away from the cottages, the Lighthousekeeper's Office is a great place to learn about North Ronaldsay's maritime history.


  • Dine out at the bird observatory and join in with the bird log that takes place every night. You might spot arctic terns, redthroats, red-backed shrikes and rosefinches.


  • Felted and knitted crafts are available from the island's mill, where wool from the local sheep is processed.


 

Getting there

The houses are open all year round. Fifteen minute flight three times a day from Kirkwall operated by Loganair or a 3-hour ferry trip again from Kirkwall operated by Orkney Ferries. The ferry runs on a Friday, and therefore both properties are available Friday to Friday, though short breaks in the winter will be flexible on arrival and departure days.

 

Please note, during the winter months, guests are advised to fly to the island as opposed to sail as sailings can be disrupted.

 

Food orders can be taken (please give us two weeks notice) and it will be delivered to your fridge for your arrival. This could include local lamb, as well as general groceries.

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Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 2, North Ronaldsay Lighthouse

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Ferocious seas and windswept headlands give these remote Lighthousekeepers' Cottages their wonderful romantic feel. It's easy to imagine the kind of shipwrecks, treasure troves, rescues and skilful seamanship of Robert Louis Stevenson's tales while on North Ronaldsay, and indeed the Lighthouse adjacent to the cottages was designed by his uncle, Alan Stevenson in 1854.
Read More >
Inside you'll find it warm and welcoming with an open fire. The cottage is all on one level and designed to be comfortable and accessible for disabled visitors.

 

Accommodation details



  • One storey


  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin


  • Kitchen with dishwasher, microwave and cooker


  • Bathroom with bath only


  • Shared laundry


  • Open fires


  • Oil central heating


  • Immersion water heating


  • Fully accessible toilet and shower


 

For larger groups Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 1 can also be booked.

 

About North Ronaldsay's Lighthouses

After a tragic shipwreck in 1740, North Ronaldsay was given one of the first four lighthouses in Scotland. The original Old Beacon was built and first lit in 1789, and shone until 1809 when it was considered redundant. After some years however it was decided that the island's perilous rocks did necessitate their own lighthouse. In 1852 Alan Stevenson recommended builder William Kinghorn of Leith to the Lighthouse Commissioners and the soaring red brick tower you see today was erected, the tallest land-based lighthouse in the British Isles.

 

About the area

Further north than the southern tip of Norway, North Ronaldsay's remoteness has helped to preserve its traditional way of life. The Norn language survived longer here than on any other Orkney isle and you'll find many of the 60 locals have Orcadian surnames that go back for generations. Common grazing on the seashore is still the custom and the local lambs feed off seaweed, giving their meat a rare flavour highly prized by chefs. The vibrant local community (who made the restoration of the Stevenson lighthouse, cottages and Mill possible) will make guests extremely welcome and should your visit coincide with one of the many concerts, dances and social gatherings that take place there, it is not to be missed. Birdwatching tours, island tours and trips up the lighthouse can also be arranged.

 

Things to do



  • 20 metres away from the cottages, the Lighthousekeeper's Office is a great place to learn about North Ronaldsay's maritime history.


  • Dine out at the bird observatory and join in with the bird log that takes place every night. You might spot arctic terns, redthroats, red-backed shrikes and rosefinches.


  • Felted and knitted crafts are available from the island's mill, where wool from the local sheep is processed.


 

Getting there

The houses are open all year round. Fifteen minute flight three times a day from Kirkwall operated by Loganair or a 3-hour ferry trip again from Kirkwall operated by Orkney Ferries. The ferry runs on a Friday, and therefore both properties are available Friday to Friday, though short breaks in the winter will be flexible on arrival and departure days.

 

Please note, during the winter months, guests are advised to fly to the island as opposed to sail as sailings can be disrupted.

 

Food orders can be taken (please give us two weeks notice) and it will be delivered to your fridge for your arrival. This could include local lamb, as well as general groceries. < Hide

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Auchenvhin, Rockcliffe

  • Dates Available
  •  None
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 10
  • 5
  • Not allowed
Auchenvhin at Rockliffe is a beautiful five bedroomed detached house in the most spectacular setting over looking Rough Island and Rough Firth at Rockliffe on the Solway Coast.
Read More >
 

The house came into the Trust’s care in 1971, and after 45 years as a long-term let, we now have the opportunity to let it as holiday accommodation. Work will start in the autumn for opening December 2016.

 

The house is set in mature gardens and is situated on an elevated position between the Mote of Mark walkway and Rough Firth.

Accommodation details



  • 2 storey


  • Sleeps 10


  • Lower floor: Double bedroom; shower room and WC; dining kitchen with aga; sitting room and dining room


  • Upper Floor: Large bathroom and shower; three bedrooms and a separate bedroom with bunkbeds


 

About Rockcliffe

Rockcliffe forms part of the Trust's conservation area, a sweep of coastline that runs along the shores of the Solway Firth. Painted white villages such as Rockcliffe itself and Kippford line the seafront. Inland, the shore gives way to patches of ancient woodland and wildflower meadows. A network of trails weaves through the area, including the Jubilee Path between Rockcliffe and Kippford.

 

About the area

Colvend village is about a mile away where you'll find a post office, general store, farm shop and golf course as well as a new Tourist Information office. Seven miles further is the country town of Dalbeattie, once famous in the early 19th century for its mills and granite industry. As well as shops for stocking up there's also a museum featuring an exhibition on Titanic's First Officer Murdoch, a local from the town.

 

Things to do



  • Pay a visit to Kirkcudbright, the 'artists' town', a short drive away. Visit the rose-pink 18th century Broughton House, once home to Glasgow Boys artist E A Hornel, and stock up on fresh fish for tea.


  • Rough Island, a bird sanctuary also owned by the Trust, can be reached on foot at low tide. There you'll see oystercatchers and ringed plovers - but please leave dogs behind!


  • Tee off on one of the area's 30 golf courses. Portpatrick's 9-hole course is close to the ruined Dunskey Castle which juts on a promontory out to sea.


 

Getting there

Rockcliffe is 7 miles S of Dalbeattie, off the A710.

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Port Donnel Cottage, Rockcliffe

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 5
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
At the end of a small private road, this secluded bright white cottage looks out onto the winding water of the Urr estuary. The garden leads to a pebble beach. If you prefer gazing out to sea from the comfort of indoors there's an open fire in the sitting room.
Read More >
It's no surprise that Port Donnel is one of our most popular holiday cottages. Rockcliffe village is part of the Trust's 109 acre nature reserve of coastline, fringed with wild flowers, sailing villages and a bird sanctuary.

 

Accommodation details



  • 2 storeys


  • Sleeps 5 - 1 twin, 1 double (can be made twin on request), 1 single


  • Sitting room with open fire


  • Kitchen


  • Dining room


  • Bathroom with bath and shower over bath


  • WC with wash basin


  • Oil-fired central heating, also heats water


  • Parking available beside the cottage


 

About Rockcliffe

Rockcliffe forms part of the Trust's conservation area, a sweep of coastline that runs along the shores of the Solway Firth. Painted white villages such as Rockcliffe itself and Kippford line the seafront. Inland, the shore gives way to patches of ancient woodland and wildflower meadows. A network of trails weaves through the area, including the Jubilee Path between Rockcliffe and Kippford.

 

About the area

Colvend village is about a mile away where you'll find a post office, general store, farm shop and golf course as well as a new Tourist Information office. Seven miles further is the country town of Dalbeattie, once famous in the early 19th century for its mills and granite industry. As well as shops for stocking up there's also a museum featuring an exhibition on Titanic's First Officer Murdoch, a local from the town.

 

Things to do



  • Pay a visit to Kirkcudbright, the 'artists' town', a short drive away. Visit the rose-pink 18th century Broughton House, once home to Glasgow Boys artist E A Hornel, and stock up on fresh fish for tea.


  • Rough Island, a bird sanctuary also owned by the Trust, can be reached on foot at low tide. There you'll see oystercatchers and ringed plovers - but please leave dogs behind!


  • Tee off on one of the area's 30 golf courses. Portpatrick's 9-hole course is close to the ruined Dunskey Castle which juts on a promontory out to sea.


 

Getting there

Rockcliffe is 7 miles S of Dalbeattie, off the A710. < Hide

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The Hill House Apartment, The Hill House

  • Dates Available
  • 3 Star Very Good
  • Glasgow, Ayrshire, Argyll & Arran
  • 6
  • 3
  • Not allowed
The Hill House Apartment is situated on the top floor of the Hill House, with access via a steep spiral staircase. The principal room of the apartment was formerly the schoolroom of the Blackie family. Like all rooms once the domain of children, it has the feeling of a place where much spirit and energy have been expended. It is large and irregularly shaped, under the roof, with bookcases and toy cupboards designed by Mackintosh. There is also a large three-sided bay window, flooding the room with daylight and looking over the Firth of Clyde and beyond.
Read More >
For those who admire Mackintosh or who wish to find out why others do, to stay here is a privilege and experience without compare.

 

Accommodation details



  • On the second floor - access is via a steep spiral staircase and is not suitable for people with mobility difficulties


  • Sleeps 6 - 1 double and 2 twin bedrooms


  • Sitting room


  • Kitchen


  • Bathroom with shower attachment


  • Gas central heating


  • Enclosed garden


  • Parking available outside the apartment


 

About The Hill House

The Hill House is the domestic masterpiece of the great Scottish architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Mackintosh was a key figure in the flowering of art in Glasgow at the end of the 19th century and a designer of extraordinary inventiveness. In 1902 he was commissioned by Walter Blackie, a publisher, to design this house and its interiors. The house blends tradition with a uniquely modern twist and is as visually striking today as it was a hundred years ago. Along with many of its original contents the house is now cared for by the National Trust for Scotland.

 

About the area

Helensburgh lies 23 miles from Glasgow on the north shore of the Firth of Clyde. The small town features shops, leisure facilities and the attractive Hermitage Park. It is also an excellent base for exploring the west of Scotland, for it is just a short drive to the southern shores of Loch Lomond and 45 minutes to Glasgow city centre by train.

 

Things to do



  • Pay a visit to nearby Geilston Garden (NTS) in Cardross. This peaceful garden is home to several glasshouses, colourful borders, a heather garden, a spectacular Wellingtonia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) and a fruit and vegetable garden.


  • Take a cruise on Loch Lomond, available from Tarbet (western shore, halfway up the loch) or Balloch (southern tip of the loch). Exploring Loch Lomond and its many islands is an unforgettable experience .


  • The Arrochar Alps, around the head of Loch Long, provide some of the best and most demanding hiking trails in the country. Summits include many Munros, such as Ben Vane (915m) and Ben Vorlich (943m). Although not a Munro, the Cobbler (Ben Arthur) is certainly the most famous peak and the one with the most impressive skyline.


 

Getting there

The Hill House is on the eastern edge of Helensburgh, off the A818, 23 miles north-west of Glasgow.

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