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Paye House, Cromarty

£825.00 | 3rd June 2017 - 10th June 2017
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
18th-century Paye House lies at the heart of Cromarty's historic conservation area, surrounded by cobbled lanes and listed buildings. Its first recorded owner was the keeper of the County Gaol who also ran an alehouse. In later years it served as one of the town's hubs as a general store, a doctors' surgery, a chip shop and a depot for antique toys. Read More >
Enjoy the Cromarty sunsets from the garden patio, make the most of the area's fine local ingredients on the kitchen's Rayburn and come home to a roaring open fire after walks around town.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storeys

  • Sleeps 6 - 2 doubles, 1 twin

  • Sitting room with open fire

  • Kitchen

  • Dining room/study area

  • Bathroom with bath and shower over bath

  • WC with wash basin

  • Garden with patio

  • Oil fired central heating

  • Free parking on Church Street, around the corner

  • EPC Rating: G20


 
About the area
Cromarty has plenty to enchant both travellers and holidaymakers: sandy beaches, Georgian architecture, bottlenose dolphins, and bird colonies of international importance. It first became a Royal Burgh in the 13th century. In the 1700s salt-fish processing and sea-trade helped to swell the town's economy, and many of its famous merchants' houses date from this era.
 
Cromarty is only 40 minutes' drive from Inverness, the "capital of the Highlands".
 
Things to do

  • Visit the birthplace of Hugh Miller. Miller was a stonemason, geologist and writer, whose thatched cottage is now a museum with a colourful garden of native plants.

  • Climb the 'Hundred steps' to South Sutor, accessed via the Reeds Park Path along the shore at the east end of town. The Sutors are rocks on either side of the firth thought once to be the abode of two giant shoemakers.

  • You'll be less than an hour's drive from Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.


 
Getting there
Cromarty is 22 miles north-east of Inverness. From the Kessock Bridge in Inverness, follow the A9 north until signs for A832 to Cromarty.
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The Precinct House, Whithorn

£455.00offer £341.25 | 3rd June 2017 - 10th June 2017
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 3
  • 2
  • Not allowed
Two centuries younger than its next door neighbour The Pend, Precinct House echoes back to a time when Whithorn's medieval streets were being refashioned in the Scottish Georgian vernacular style. The house is made up of two buildings joined together by a glass atrium, perfect for sunny indoor dining. Read More >
The name refers to an early monastic precinct, which was divided up to make the gardens of later houses. Period fire grates, Georgian furniture and a magnificent four-poster bed create a faithful reconstruction of the house as it originally stood.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storey
  • Sleeps 3 - 1 double, 1 small single with compact box bed
  • Sitting room
  • Glass-roofed dining room
  • Kitchen
  • Shower room
  • Enclosed courtyard with garden furniture and barbeque
  • Free wifi (telephone calls up to one hour also free)
  • Under floor oil-fired central heating
  • Open fire - 1 bag of fuel provided
  • Parking available on the front street
  • Public transport accessible
  • EPC Rating: E40

 
About Whithorn
The Precinct House lies at the heart of the Outstanding Conservation Area of Whithorn, one of Scotland's oldest settlements and once the seat of Celtic Christianity.
 
Visiting Whithorn Priory you will join a long line of Royal pilgrims, from Edward II of England through to Robert the Bruce, James IV and Mary Queen of Scots. 15th century pilgrims from Europe were required to obtain a badge from the priory as proof of their visit - the precursor to today's passports. The ruins of the 12th-century Romanesque cathedral and its adjacent crypts are only an echo of the grand structure that would once have stood.
 
Whithorn is famed for its outstanding local produce and is at most three miles in any direction from the sea. At nearby Garlieston the shallow sandy beach is very suitable for toddlers and young children, since there is no deep water.
 
About the area
Whithorn lies at the south end of the Machars, or 'plains of Galloway', a peninsula surrounded by sea on three sides and, rich dairy farm country on the fourth.
 
Inhabited since the Bronze Age, the surrounding countryside is an archaeological treasure trove. Ten miles away, Wigtown, Scotland's new Book Town, is home to a variety of bookshops and hosts a literary festival in September, as well as fairs and regular markets.
 
Things to do

  • Pull on your hiking boots and head to the Southern Uplands, half an hour's drive away, for some challenging hill walking.
  • The Galloway Forest Park is home to the UK's first Dark-Sky Park, a hotspot for stargazing, due to its pitch black unpolluted skies.
  • Rock and harbour fishing, golf and off-road driving for the adventurous are available nearby.
 
Getting there
To reach Whithorn, turn south at the Newton Stewart roundabout on the A714 following signs to Whithorn. < Hide

Garden Cottage, Towie Barclay Castle

£785.00 | 3rd June 2017 - 10th June 2017
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Aberdeen & Grampian
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
This charming cottage is set next to the courtyard of 16th century Towie Barclay Castle. Its restoration won the Civic Trust Award, in honour of its beautifully preserved period features such as the stone-flagged floors and timber ceilings. Read More >
In summertime relax in the cottage's private, enclosed garden and make use of the barbeque, or drive off into the wooded countryside to explore this historic part of the north.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storey

  • Sleeps 4-6 - 2 doubles plus double sofa bed in study off master bedroom

  • Sitting room with open fire

  • Dining Kitchen

  • Shower room

  • Utility room

  • Master bedroom has en suite bathroom with sauna

  • Private garden with patio and barbeque

  • WiFi

  • Electric Dimplex heating

 
...Our guests said...
"..we felt at home the moment we stepped in the door..."
 
"..full of charm and character. The tour of the castle and coffee was very much appreciated and a highlight of our stay".
 
About Towie Barclay Castle
Towie Barclay Castle, some 4 miles south of the market town of Turriff in Aberdeenshire, was built in the 16th century by the Barclay family. The castle lay in ruins until 1971 when an award-winning programme of restoration was carried out by the present owners. It is now privately owned.
 
About the area
In the heart of rural Aberdeenshire, close to Royal Deeside, whisky distilleries, museums, over 50 golf courses, historical sites and the cliffs of the Moray coast, Towie Barclay is an ideal base from which to discover the many lesser-known jewels in Scotland's crown.
 
Things to do

  • A visit to the area would not be complete without taking in breathtaking Fyvie Castle, a few miles away. A little further afield, (approx 1.5 hours drive) Craigievar Castle is another fabulous example of turretted Scottish Baronial architecture.

  • Crovie village, perched on a ledge between cliff and sea and too narrow to even allow cars, is approximately 20 miles away. Take a walk along the pebble beach and keep an eye out for bottlenosed dolphins.

 
Getting there
The cottage is situated just off the A947, 4 miles from Turriff. Aberdeen is 27 miles away.
 
Public transport accessible. Short breaks are not available at this property, it is restricted to full weeks only (Saturday to Saturday). Please note that the entry time to this property is from 5pm onwards on day of arrival. < Hide
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