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Bynack, Mar Lodge Estate

£1,215.00 | 31st October 2014 - 3rd November 2014
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Royal Deeside
  • 17
  • 8
  • Dogs allowed
This large apartment spreads over two floors with views of the Mar Lodge estate's heather and pine forests. It can comfortably accommodate 17 guests around the dinner table making it ideal for family gatherings in an historic Highland setting. Read More >
Open log fires in the lodge's public rooms and acres of rambling walks around the estate will help you relax into Royal Deeside's majestic country charm.
 
Bynack is one of 5 apartments in Mar Lodge. For exceptional luxury for parties of up to ten, we are delighted to offer two detached lodge houses in the estate grounds: Claybokie and Creag Bhalg. Both houses are beautifully furnished, and possess lavish kitchens and terraced gardens.
 
Accommodation details

  • Ground and first floor

  • Sleeps 17 - 1 double with ensuite (ground floor - ideally suited for less mobile guests); 4 twins, 2 doubles and 1 double with single on first floor.

  • 4 bathrooms, 3 with roll-top bath and shower and 1 with shower only.

  • Additional WC on ground floor.

  • Modern, recently refurbished kitchen and separate sitting room with dining area which can comfortably seat all 17 guests.

  • Gas-fired central heating

  • Electric fire in lounge

  • Free Wi-Fi internet access available in reception hall and dining room of main lodge

  • Kennel facilities are available at an additional charge.


 
About the Mar Lodge Estate
At the heart of the Cairngorms National Park lies Mar Lodge, a a restored Victorian sporting lodge set in 29,380 hectares of wilderness, heather and ancient pine.
 
Visited by nobility since the medieval period, this prime Highland estate is now recognised as one of Scotland's most important conservation sites. From significant archaeological finds, to rare wildlife, and four of Britain's highest mountains, the estate is a jewel in the crown of one of the country's most iconic landscapes.
 
About the Area
Royal Deeside weaves along the River Dee, overlapping the Cairngorms National Park and Aberdeenshire. Best known for its majestic scenery, it is also an area rich in wildlife from alpine flora to Scottish wildcats.
 
Deeside's most famous admirer, Queen Victoria, purchased the Balmoral estate in 1848, and the royal connections continue to this day, with Princes William and Harry being regular visitors to the area. The nearest town to Mar Lodge is Braemar where you'll find local amenities as well as bases for hiking and skiing.
 
Things to do

  • Adventure-lovers can test themselves with challenging mountain hikes, while gentler walks can be enjoyed along lowland paths through magnificent countryside.

  • Summertime is perfect for mountain-biking, and in winter downhill and cross-country skiing at Glenshee are only a short drive away.


 
Interested in our ranger-led activities?
The following activities are available on the estate by prior arrangement:
-"Live like a laird"- journey out as dawn breaks to see the waking of the black grouse, the return to the Lodge for a hearty, full Scottish breakfast and
-"Shoot with a camera"- accompany the estate's stalkers into the hills to see stags roaming as the mist lifts.
-Traditional field sports: stag stalking,grouse shooting and salmon fishing
 
Planning a large event, a wedding or corporate gathering?
The Stag Ballroom, adjacent to the Lodge, is a popular venue for wedding receptions, ceilidhs and family gatherings, with room for up to 160 guests. Within the Lodge, the more intimate setting of the Craggan Ballroom can accommodate 50 seated guests and the grand dining room, which seats 30. For further details on corporate entertaining or any events, please contact Mar Lodge on 0844 493 2172 or +44(0)13397 41433/41427 if calling from overseas.
 
Horse owners can now bring their equine friends. Enquire about Mar Lodge's horse B&B when you book.
 
Getting there
Braemar is 60 miles west of Aberdeen and 50 miles north of Perth on the A93. Aberdeen airport is situated in Dyce on the outskirts of Aberdeen. Mar Lodge estate is 3 miles West of Braemar, in Aberdeenshire.
 
Bynack is available for short breaks (minimum stay 3 nights) throughout the year. Discounted prices are available for smaller groups within 1 month of departure. Please contact the Holidays Department on 0844 493 2108 for further details.
 
Guests will be asked to provide credit/debit card details as a “good housekeeping deposit” to cover any damages/ breakages which may occur. The deposit is £500 and will only be processed in the event of any damage to the property and its contents.
 
Subject to availability, visitors may make use of the public rooms in the Lodge; the library, billiard room and drawing room. The grand dining room, which seats 30 people, and a caterers' kitchen are available to guests booking all five apartments. Please note there is an extra charge for this.
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Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 1, North Ronaldsay Lighthouse

£330.00 | 31st October 2014 - 7th November 2014
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Ferocious seas and windswept headlands give these remote Lighthousekeepers' Cottages their wonderful romantic feel. It's easy to imagine the kind of shipwrecks, treasure troves, rescues and skilful seamanship of Robert Louis Stevenson's tales while on North Ronaldsay, and indeed the Lighthouse adjacent to the cottages was designed by his uncle, Alan Stevenson in 1854. Read More >
Inside you'll find it warm and welcoming with an open fire. The cottage is all on one level and designed to be comfortable and accessible for disabled visitors.
 
Accommodation details

  • One storey

  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin

  • Kitchen with dishwasher, microwave and cooker

  • Bathroom with bath only

  • Shared laundry

  • Open fires

  • Oil central heating

  • Immersion water heating

  • Fully accessible toilet and shower

 
For larger groups Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 2 can also be booked.
 
About North Ronaldsay's Lighthouses
After a tragic shipwreck in 1740, North Ronaldsay was given one of the first four lighthouses in Scotland. The original Old Beacon was built and first lit in 1789, and shone until 1809 when it was considered redundant. After some years however it was decided that the island's perilous rocks did necessitate their own lighthouse. In 1852 Alan Stevenson recommended builder William Kinghorn of Leith to the Lighthouse Commissioners and the soaring red brick tower you see today was erected, the tallest land-based lighthouse in the British Isles.
 
About the area
Further north than the southern tip of Norway, North Ronaldsay's remoteness has helped to preserve its traditional way of life. The Norn language survived longer here than on any other Orkney isle and you'll find many of the 60 locals have Orcadian surnames that go back for generations. Common grazing on the seashore is still the custom and the local lambs feed off seaweed, giving their meat a rare flavour highly prized by chefs. The vibrant local community (who made the restoration of the Stevenson lighthouse, cottages and Mill possible) will make guests extremely welcome and should your visit coincide with one of the many concerts, dances and social gatherings that take place there, it is not to be missed. Birdwatching tours, island tours and trips up the lighthouse can also be arranged.
 
Things to do

  • 20 metres away from the cottages, the Lighthousekeeper's Office is a great place to learn about North Ronaldsay's maritime history.

  • Dine out at the bird observatory and join in with the bird log that takes place every night. You might spot arctic terns, redthroats, red-backed shrikes and rosefinches.

  • Felted and knitted crafts are available from the island's mill, where wool from the local sheep is processed.

 
Getting there
The houses are open all year round. Fifteen minute flight three times a day from Kirkwall operated by Loganair or a 3-hour ferry trip again from Kirkwall operated by Orkney Ferries. The ferry runs on a Friday, and therefore both properties are available Friday to Friday, though short breaks in the winter will be flexible on arrival and departure days.
 
Please note, during the winter months, guests are advised to fly to the island as opposed to sail as sailings can be disrupted.
 
Food orders can be taken (please give us two weeks notice) and it will be delivered to your fridge for your arrival. This could include local lamb, as well as general groceries.
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Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 2, North Ronaldsay Lighthouse

£330.00 | 31st October 2014 - 7th November 2014
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Ferocious seas and windswept headlands give these remote Lighthousekeepers' Cottages their wonderful romantic feel. It's easy to imagine the kind of shipwrecks, treasure troves, rescues and skilful seamanship of Robert Louis Stevenson's tales while on North Ronaldsay, and indeed the Lighthouse adjacent to the cottages was designed by his uncle, Alan Stevenson in 1854. Read More >
Inside you'll find it warm and welcoming with an open fire. The cottage is all on one level and designed to be comfortable and accessible for disabled visitors.
 
Accommodation details

  • One storey

  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin

  • Kitchen with dishwasher, microwave and cooker

  • Bathroom with bath only

  • Shared laundry

  • Open fires

  • Oil central heating

  • Immersion water heating

  • Fully accessible toilet and shower

 
For larger groups Lighthousekeeper's Cottage 1 can also be booked.
 
About North Ronaldsay's Lighthouses
After a tragic shipwreck in 1740, North Ronaldsay was given one of the first four lighthouses in Scotland. The original Old Beacon was built and first lit in 1789, and shone until 1809 when it was considered redundant. After some years however it was decided that the island's perilous rocks did necessitate their own lighthouse. In 1852 Alan Stevenson recommended builder William Kinghorn of Leith to the Lighthouse Commissioners and the soaring red brick tower you see today was erected, the tallest land-based lighthouse in the British Isles.
 
About the area
Further north than the southern tip of Norway, North Ronaldsay's remoteness has helped to preserve its traditional way of life. The Norn language survived longer here than on any other Orkney isle and you'll find many of the 60 locals have Orcadian surnames that go back for generations. Common grazing on the seashore is still the custom and the local lambs feed off seaweed, giving their meat a rare flavour highly prized by chefs. The vibrant local community (who made the restoration of the Stevenson lighthouse, cottages and Mill possible) will make guests extremely welcome and should your visit coincide with one of the many concerts, dances and social gatherings that take place there, it is not to be missed. Birdwatching tours, island tours and trips up the lighthouse can also be arranged.
 
Things to do

  • 20 metres away from the cottages, the Lighthousekeeper's Office is a great place to learn about North Ronaldsay's maritime history.

  • Dine out at the bird observatory and join in with the bird log that takes place every night. You might spot arctic terns, redthroats, red-backed shrikes and rosefinches.

  • Felted and knitted crafts are available from the island's mill, where wool from the local sheep is processed.

 
Getting there
The houses are open all year round. Fifteen minute flight three times a day from Kirkwall operated by Loganair or a 3-hour ferry trip again from Kirkwall operated by Orkney Ferries. The ferry runs on a Friday, and therefore both properties are available Friday to Friday, though short breaks in the winter will be flexible on arrival and departure days.
 
Please note, during the winter months, guests are advised to fly to the island as opposed to sail as sailings can be disrupted.
 
Food orders can be taken (please give us two weeks notice) and it will be delivered to your fridge for your arrival. This could include local lamb, as well as general groceries. < Hide
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