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Gate Lodge, Threave Estate

£280.00 | 28th January 2019 - 1st February 2019
  • Dates available
  • 3 StarVery Good
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 5
  • 3
  • Not allowed
This rosy 19th century sandstone lodge guards the entrance to the Threave Estate, with a perfect view onto Threave's famous gardens that bloom with daffodils in the spring. The Housekeeper to the Gordon family once lived here. Now it's a fantastic base for families to escape to a haven of wildlife and baronial splendour. Read More >
The lodge has views over the glassy surface of Carlingwark Loch, while an open fire and a garden (not enclosed) with patio furniture make it comfortable and cosy both inside and out.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storey

  • Sleeps 5 - 1 twin (first floor), 1 double (ground floor), 1 single (first floor)

  • Sitting room with open fire

  • Kitchen

  • Separate dining room

  • Bathroom with shower over bath

  • Additional WC with shower and wash basin

  • Oil-fired central heating/hot water

  • Large unenclosed garden

  • Parking available

  • Public transport accessible

  • EPC Rating: E49

 
For larger groups, Millwheel and Granary Cottages can be booked, each sleeping 4.
 
About Threave Estate
Staying at Threave means you'll be able to make the most of the many things there are to see and do. This 14th century estate once belonged to the 'Black' Douglas family but was bought in 1867 by a successful Liverpool businessman who set about building the baronial mansion at the heart of the gardens. Threave's 1,490-acres weave through wetlands, woodlands, peat and rock gardens. Inside the house, themed rooms give a flavour of 1930s mansion life for Scotland's upper crust. Lose yourself in the secret garden, take a wander round the open-air sculpture collection and keep an eye out for bats; Threave is one of Scotland's hotspots for them.
 
About the area
Threave lies about a mile from Castle Douglas, the 'Food Town', known for its fine fresh local produce, its brewers, butchers and delicatessens. Castle Douglas was established in the late 18th century, along the same grid plan as Edinburgh's New Town, and thrived as a market hub. Its 1900 hexagonal Auction Mart is still in use today. In the surrounding countryside red squirrels, woodpeckers, badgers and hares make their home.
 
Things to do

  • Stock up on fresh-grown fruit and vegetables from the Threave estate, available from the estate shop, and make the most of Gate Lodge's kitchen.

  • Take a drive to Kirkcudbright, 'The Artists' Town', just over 20 miles away to see Broughton House, the rose-pink former home of Glasgow Boys painter E A Hornel.

  • Rockcliffe, the Trust-owned sweep of pebble beaches and ancient woodland is a short drive away. Visit the ruined Dark Age citadel Mote of Mark or walk between the sailing villages that line the seafront.

 
Getting there
Threave is just off the A75, 1 mile west of Castle Douglas.
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Glen Cottage, Torridon

£345.00 | 28th January 2019 - 1st February 2019
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Highlands, Western Isles & Northern Isles
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
This historic cottage lies tucked at the foot of some of Scotland's most breathtaking mountains. Torridonian sandstone peaks, sheer slopes and hulking munros form the backdrop for a wildlife-lovers' hideaway where you can truly get away from it all. Read More >
Deer, otters and golden eagles make their home in the vicinity. Keep an eye out for them while hiking or relaxing in the cottage's enclosed garden.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storey

  • Sleeps 6 - 2 double, 1 twin

  • Sitting room with wood-burning stove

  • Large dining kitchen with wood-burning stove

  • 2 shower rooms one on ground floor and one on first floor

  • Night storage and panel heaters

  • Immersion water heating

  • EPC Rating: E39


In extreme weather conditions, access to Torridon may be difficult.
 
About Torridon
Torridon refers to both the local village and the estate it lies in, a 6500 hectare wilderness on the shores of Loch Torridon. Five of the Trust's 46 munros are located within the estate including Beinn Alligin, 985m (3,230ft), which means 'jewelled hill' in Gaelic. The Trust's Countryside Centre has information on the history, geology and wildlife of the region.
 
About the area
Wild isolation is what draws most people to Torridon, but for essential supplies Torridon village and Kinlochewe are the places to head. Settlements have a long history in the area as it was used for processing pig iron in the 17th century. These days you'll find general stores, a postal service and the triple rosette-winning Torridon Hotel Restaurant.
 
Things to do

  • Inverewe Garden is just over an hour's drive away. Here you can wander through an exotic paradise of rare and colourful flora perched on a breezy hillside above Loch Ewe.

  • Corrieshalloch Gorge is also around an hour away. This cleave in the mountains, through which the River Droma charges, was created 2.6 million years ago by Ice Age meltwater and offers spine-tingling views from its swaying suspension bridge.

  • Children will love the local deer park, or beachcombing for crabs on the shores of Loch Torridon.


 
Getting there
Torridon is on the A896, which leads off from the A832. From Inverness take the A835 towards Ullapool before turning off. < Hide

Granary Cottage, Threave Estate

£280.00 | 28th January 2019 - 1st February 2019
  • Dates available
  • 3 StarVery Good
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
Granary Cottage forms one half of the old Kelton Mill, a 19th century water mill used to process corn during the years when the Solway area was a hub of industry. The old mill's character has been preserved with a broad open-plan feel, high-beamed ceilings and country-style furniture. Read More >
It's thought that a mill existed on the site since the 15th century. After WWII, it became a farm store, and was later used for community barn dances. Views from the back patio look across the Slackie Burn that would have once powered the mill.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storey

  • Sleeps 4 - 2 twins

  • Sitting room

  • Large open-plan kitchen with dining area

  • Bathroom with shower over bath

  • Separate WC

  • Walled patio

  • Portable electric heaters, white meter heating

  • Immersion water heating

  • Car parking available

  • Public transport accessible

  • EPC Rating: F35

 
We welcome families with children to Granary Cottage but parents/guardians should be aware of the stream behind the cottage as well as the road in front of the accommodation and should not let children play unattended.
 
For larger groups, Millwheel Cottage next door sleeps 4 people, while Gate Lodge at the entrance to Threave sleeps 5.
 
About Threave Estate
Staying at Threave means you'll be able to make the most of the many things there are to see and do. This 14th century estate once belonged to the 'Black' Douglas family but was bought in 1867 by a successful Liverpool businessman who set about building the baronial mansion at the heart of the gardens. Threave's 1,490-acres weave through wetlands, woodlands, peat and rock gardens. Inside the house, themed rooms give a flavour of 1930s mansion life for Scotland's upper crust. Lose yourself in the secret garden, take a wander round the open-air sculpture collection and keep an eye out for bats; Threave is one of Scotland's hotspots for them.
 
About the area
Threave lies about a mile from Castle Douglas, the 'Food Town', known for its fine fresh local produce, its brewers, butchers and delicatessens. Castle Douglas was established in the late 18th century, along the same grid plan as Edinburgh's New Town, and thrived as a market hub. Its 1900 hexagonal Auction Mart is still in use today. In the surrounding countryside red squirrels, woodpeckers, badgers and hares make their home.
 
Things to do

  • Stock up on fresh-grown fruit and vegetables from the Threave estate, available from the estate shop, and make the most of Gate Lodge's kitchen.

  • Take a drive to Kirkcudbright, 'The Artists' Town', just over 20 miles away to see Broughton House, the rose-pink former home of Glasgow Boys painter E A Hornel.

  • Rockcliffe, the Trust-owned sweep of pebble beaches and ancient woodland is a short drive away. Visit the ruined Dark Age citadel Mote of Mark or walk between the sailing villages that line the seafront.

 
Getting there
Threave is just off the A75, 1 mile west of Castle Douglas.
< Hide
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