Offer : Offer at The Pend, Precinct House and Faldarroch Farm


Faldarroch Farm, Port William

Offer available
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 5
  • 2
  • Not allowed
This small Victorian dairy farm dates back to a time when agriculture was undergoing nationwide changes in order to feed a growing population. A beautifully preserved farm cottage forms the centrepiece among outbuildings, a byre, steading and calf shed. Faldarroch is also now part of the Walkers and Cyclists Welcome Schemes and has a drying room for wet clothes and storage for bikes/outdoor boots and clothing. Read More >
The open-plan farm kitchen is warmed by an original working range, a Victorian iron four-poster bed lies at the centre of the master bedroom, and outdoors, as the land rolls down to the sea, wildlife such as red squirrels abound.
 
In the paddock, beyond the walled garden, there is newly excavated wildlife pond, with a burn tumbling in and out, which you can cross using the two wooden bridges. Planting of this area is a long term project, but water-loving plants and trees are gradually being introduced to populate the banks and brown trout will make an appearance as the vegetation grows up. Local birds, including herons, wagtails and swallows are already making use of the pond. Sit on one of the handy boulders on the banks in summer and watch the dragonflies!
 
Accommodation details

  • Sleeps 4/5 - 1 double, 1 twin (family room) with box beds, 1 single

  • Open-plan farm kitchen with sitting area, range and wood-burning stove

  • Eco-friendly insulation and heating

  • Wood-pellet boiler

  • Solar electricity

  • Bathroom with roll-top bath and shower over

  • Family room

  • Stove in master bedroom

  • Barn for storing bicycles and outdoor clothing

  • Paddock


About the area
Two miles away the fishing village of Port William wraps round the coast of Luce Bay, looking across to the Mull of Galloway. It's thought that a Christian settlement was founded in the area not long after St Ninian came to Scotland, however in the 17th and 18th centuries it became better known as a hotbed of smuggling. Safe beaches, glorious sunsets, and rare wildlife make this part of The Machars coast a blissful holiday haven.
 
Things to do

  • The Galloway Forest Park is home to the UK's first Dark-Sky Park, a hotspot for stargazing, due to its pitch black unpolluted skies.

  • Whithorn is less than half an hour's drive away. Join Robert the Bruce, King James IV, Mary Queen of Scots and a long line of Royal visitors who travelled to the now-ruined 12th century monastery that once housed the relics of St Ninian.

  • Stand at Scotland's southernmost tip at Mull of Galloway, looking across the sea to Ireland and the Isle of Man. After Easter 2013 you'll be able to climb the lighthouse tower, built by Robert Louis Stevenson's grandfather. Keep an eye out for seabirds; the area is part of an RSPB reserve.


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The Pend, Whithorn

Offer available
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 4
  • 2
  • Not allowed
History is built into the walls of this 16th-century lime-washed gatehouse to the Priory at Whithorn. A magnificent dark wood four-poster bed rests at the centre of its master bedroom, 17th-century windows open out onto the street, and a smoking peat fire warms the lounge. Read More >
The Priory next door once housed the relics of St Ninian, a local missionary, bishop and mystic healer who died around 431AD. Medieval Kings and Queens travelled to Whithorn to pray at his bones, seeking either cures or salvation.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storeys

  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin with 6ft box beds

  • Large sitting/dining room with working fireplace (bag of fuel provided)

  • Kitchen

  • Bathroom with bath and shower attachment

  • Family room

  • Small paved courtyard with garden furniture and barbeque

  • Under-floor oil-fired central heating

  • Internet access in adjacent Visitor Centre

  • Off-road parking is available

  • Public transport accessible

  • EPC Rating: E39

 
The Pend has some doorways below standard height. The master bedroom's 17th-century windows open directly on to the street below and may not be suitable for young children.
 
...Our guests said...
"A few quiet days in the Shire over Half Term. By and large we retraced our steps from ( many ) previous visits : trying to spot all of the crosses in St Ninian's Cave; enjoying the snowdrops in the woods at Galloway House; book browsing in Wigtown, and watching wildflowl at the hide by the harbour... As always the local produce is so good that we hardly had anything that was not sourced with D&G" (Mr. Welfare,Director of English Heritage, York)
"A wonderful and special place for our holiday. We've never been to the area before, and your welcome and the beauty of this cottage were a gift to us...And peat fires every night" (Mr. and Mrs. Chapman, Pittsburgh, PA )
"The Pend is just fabulous, every conceivable thing is here ( including a beautiful Christmas tree and festive table decorations) all carefully thought about." ( McNaught Family, Edinburgh)
 
About Whithorn
The Pend lies at the heart of the Outstanding Conservation Area of Whithorn, one of Scotland's oldest settlements and once the seat of Celtic Christianity.
 
Visiting Whithorn Priory you will join a long line of Royal pilgrims, from Edward II of England through to Robert the Bruce, James IV and Mary Queen of Scots. 15th century pilgrims from Europe were required to obtain a badge from the priory as proof of their visit - the precursor to today's passports. The ruins of the 12th-century Romanesque cathedral and its adjacent crypts are only an echo of the grand structure that would once have stood.
 
Whithorn is famed for its outstanding local produce and is at most three miles in any direction from the sea. At nearby Garlieston the shallow sandy beach is very suitable for toddlers and young children, since there is no deep water.
 
About the area
Whithorn lies at the south end of the Machars, or 'plains of Galloway', a peninsula surrounded by sea on three sides and, rich dairy farm country on the fourth.
 
Inhabited since the Bronze Age, the surrounding countryside is an archaeological treasure trove. Ten miles away, Wigtown, Scotland's new Book Town, is home to a variety of bookshops and hosts a literary festival in September, as well as fairs and regular markets.
 
Things to do

  • Pull on your hiking boots and head to the Southern Uplands, half an hour's drive away, for some challenging hill walking.

  • The Galloway Forest Park is home to the UK's first Dark-Sky Park, a hotspot for stargazing, due to its pitch black unpolluted skies.

  • Rock and harbour fishing, golf and off-road driving for the adventurous are available nearby.

 
Getting there
To reach Whithorn, turn south at the Newton Stewart roundabout on the A714 following signs to Whithorn.
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The Precinct House, Whithorn

Offer available
  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Dumfries & Galloway
  • 3
  • 2
  • Not allowed
Two centuries younger than its next door neighbour The Pend, Precinct House echoes back to a time when Whithorn's medieval streets were being refashioned in the Scottish Georgian vernacular style. The house is made up of two buildings joined together by a glass atrium, perfect for sunny indoor dining. Read More >
The name refers to an early monastic precinct, which was divided up to make the gardens of later houses. Period fire grates, Georgian furniture and a magnificent four-poster bed create a faithful reconstruction of the house as it originally stood.
 
Accommodation details

  • 2 storey
  • Sleeps 3 - 1 double, 1 small single with compact box bed
  • Sitting room
  • Glass-roofed dining room
  • Kitchen
  • Shower room
  • Enclosed courtyard with garden furniture and barbeque
  • Free wifi (telephone calls up to one hour also free)
  • Under floor oil-fired central heating
  • Open fire - 1 bag of fuel provided
  • Parking available on the front street
  • Public transport accessible
  • EPC Rating: E40

 
About Whithorn
The Precinct House lies at the heart of the Outstanding Conservation Area of Whithorn, one of Scotland's oldest settlements and once the seat of Celtic Christianity.
 
Visiting Whithorn Priory you will join a long line of Royal pilgrims, from Edward II of England through to Robert the Bruce, James IV and Mary Queen of Scots. 15th century pilgrims from Europe were required to obtain a badge from the priory as proof of their visit - the precursor to today's passports. The ruins of the 12th-century Romanesque cathedral and its adjacent crypts are only an echo of the grand structure that would once have stood.
 
Whithorn is famed for its outstanding local produce and is at most three miles in any direction from the sea. At nearby Garlieston the shallow sandy beach is very suitable for toddlers and young children, since there is no deep water.
 
About the area
Whithorn lies at the south end of the Machars, or 'plains of Galloway', a peninsula surrounded by sea on three sides and, rich dairy farm country on the fourth.
 
Inhabited since the Bronze Age, the surrounding countryside is an archaeological treasure trove. Ten miles away, Wigtown, Scotland's new Book Town, is home to a variety of bookshops and hosts a literary festival in September, as well as fairs and regular markets.
 
Things to do

  • Pull on your hiking boots and head to the Southern Uplands, half an hour's drive away, for some challenging hill walking.
  • The Galloway Forest Park is home to the UK's first Dark-Sky Park, a hotspot for stargazing, due to its pitch black unpolluted skies.
  • Rock and harbour fishing, golf and off-road driving for the adventurous are available nearby.
 
Getting there
To reach Whithorn, turn south at the Newton Stewart roundabout on the A714 following signs to Whithorn. < Hide

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