Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle

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Lydia Cottage, Cromarty

Offer available
  • Dates available
  • 3 StarVery Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 2
  • 1
  • Dogs allowed
This traditional Cromarty cottage was built around 1911 on the site of Cromarty's former fire station. Fully refurbished with modern creature comforts it provides a spacious base for two people to explore the wildlife and history at the heart of this Black Isle town. Read More >
The cottage lies in Cromarty's Fishertown area, once populated by herring fishers and close enough to hear the waves lapping against the shores of the Cromarty Firth. An enclosed garden with a picnic table is perfect for summer barbeques.

Accommodation details

  • 2 storeys - detached cottage

  • Sleeps 2 - 1 twin bedroom

  • Sitting room

  • Kitchen with dining area

  • Shower room with double shower

  • Open fire

  • Electric storage heaters and electric immersion heater

  • Parking available at eastern gable end of cottage - not reserved but usually available

  • Public transport accessible

  • EPC Rating: D64

  • The first floor is accessed by a spiral staircase and is not suitable for anyone with mobility issues



About the area
Cromarty has plenty to enchant both travellers and holidaymakers: sandy beaches, Georgian architecture, bottlenose dolphins, and bird colonies of international importance. It first became a Royal Burgh in the 13th century. In the 1700s salt-fish processing and sea-trade helped to swell the town's economy, and many of its famous merchants' houses date from this era.

Cromarty is only 40 minutes' drive from Inverness, the "capital of the Highlands".

Things to do

  • Visit the birthplace of Hugh Miller. Miller was a stonemason, geologist and writer, whose thatched cottage is now a museum with a colourful garden of native plants.

  • Climb the 'Hundred steps' to South Sutor, accessed via the Reeds Park Path along the shore at the east end of town. The Sutors are rocks on either side of the firth thought once to be the abode of two giant shoemakers.

  • You'll be less than an hour's drive from Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.



Getting there
Cromarty is 22 miles north-east of Inverness. From the Kessock Bridge in Inverness, follow the A9 north until signs for A832 to Cromarty. < Hide

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Paye House, Cromarty

  • Dates available
  • 4 StarExcellent
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 6
  • 3
  • Dogs allowed
18th-century Paye House lies at the heart of Cromarty's historic conservation area, surrounded by cobbled lanes and listed buildings. Its first recorded owner was the keeper of the County Gaol who also ran an alehouse. In later years it served as one of the town's hubs as a general store, a doctors' surgery, a chip shop and a depot for antique toys. Read More >
Enjoy the Cromarty sunsets from the garden patio, make the most of the area's fine local ingredients on the kitchen's Rayburn and come home to a roaring open fire after walks around town.

Accommodation details

  • 2 storeys

  • Sleeps 6 - 2 doubles, 1 twin

  • Sitting room with open fire

  • Kitchen

  • Dining room/study area

  • Bathroom with bath and shower over bath

  • WC with wash basin

  • Garden with patio

  • Oil fired central heating

  • Free parking on Church Street, around the corner

  • EPC Rating: G20



About the area
Cromarty has plenty to enchant both travellers and holidaymakers: sandy beaches, Georgian architecture, bottlenose dolphins, and bird colonies of international importance. It first became a Royal Burgh in the 13th century. In the 1700s salt-fish processing and sea-trade helped to swell the town's economy, and many of its famous merchants' houses date from this era.

Cromarty is only 40 minutes' drive from Inverness, the "capital of the Highlands".

Things to do

  • Visit the birthplace of Hugh Miller. Miller was a stonemason, geologist and writer, whose thatched cottage is now a museum with a colourful garden of native plants.

  • Climb the 'Hundred steps' to South Sutor, accessed via the Reeds Park Path along the shore at the east end of town. The Sutors are rocks on either side of the firth thought once to be the abode of two giant shoemakers.

  • You'll be less than an hour's drive from Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.



Getting there
Cromarty is 22 miles north-east of Inverness. From the Kessock Bridge in Inverness, follow the A9 north until signs for A832 to Cromarty.
< Hide

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South Lodge, Brodie Castle

Offer available
  • Dates available
  • 3 StarVery Good
  • Inverness, Nairn, Moray & The Black Isle
  • 4
  • 2
  • Dogs allowed
South Lodge is sunny, secluded and perfect for families with children. The lodge lies close to magnificent 16th century Brodie castle, set in grounds that offer hours of woodland and beachside walks. Read More >
A large garden for impromptu picnics and playful dogs, and a warm wood-burning stove in the sitting room make this a great retreat at any time of year.

Accommodation details

  • 1 storey

  • Sleeps 4 - 1 double, 1 twin

  • Sitting room with wood-burning stove

  • Kitchen with dining area

  • Bathroom with bath and shower

  • Night storage heaters

  • Immersion water heating

  • Parking available beside the cottage

  • Public transport accessible

  • EPC Rating: G20



Larger groups can also book Cormack Lodge, a single-storey cottage just a short stroll from Brodie Castle, sleeping 2/4.

About Brodie Castle
The imposing turrets of Brodie Castle stand between Nairn and Forres, close to the beaches of the Moray Firth. The castle dates from the mid-16th century, and is filled with Dutch, English and early 20th-century art.

Famous for its extravagant display of daffodils in the spring, the extensive grounds also offer trails, bird hides and an adventure playground.

About the area
Forres is the closest town, and also one of Scotland's oldest, having been a Royal Burgh since 1140. There are plenty of shops on offer for stocking up.

Brodie Castle is also an excellent base for exploring the Cairngorm mountains, the Black Isle and the Moray Firth, Loch Ness and Glen Affric.

Things to do

  • The Moray Firth has stunning beaches. Try Cullen Bay for dolphin watching or Findhorn for its laid back atmosphere.

  • Visit the Sueno Stone on the north-eastern edge of Forres. The 21ft high stone is Scotland's largest and most intricate piece of Pictish carving.

  • At Brodie, you'll be staying just half-an hour's drive from the battlefield at Culloden. Discover the story behind the Jacobite uprising and the last battle to be fought on Scottish soil.



Getting there
Brodie Castle is off the A96, 4 miles west of Forres and 24 miles east of Inverness. < Hide

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