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Facts:
  • The Trust owns and manages 5 out of the top 10 highest mountains in Scotland
  • Ben Macdui the second highest mountain in the UK and is part of our Mar Lodge property

Where in Britain will you find a grander array of rock than the Torridon mountains? Or a wider vista than from the summit of Ben Macdui on Mar Lodge Estate? Where will you find landmarks more familiar than the mountains of Glencoe, or the Five Sisters of Kintail? Or hills more cherished by the populace than Ben Lomond towering majestically above its loch of islands, or Goatfell towering above the sands of Arran? Where will you find as rich an Arctic-Alpine flora as that on Ben Lawers, or a hill more wild than Sgurr nan Ceathreathnan in West Affric? Where will waterfalls be more spectacular and more remote than at the Falls of Glomach, or gorges deeper than at Corrieshalloch? Where indeed!

Thousands of people visit our mountains each year and Inevitably this amount of feet can cause wear and tear on paths and ultimately the landscape.

To protect the fragile soils from erosion we have removed high altitude vehicle tracks and restored many kilometres of upland footpaths, most recently through our Mountains for People Project. To help us carry out this work the Trust established a Sole Trading Fund, enabling people to contribute financially towards this valuable conservation work. Mountains - are core to the heart of Scotland and the landholdings of the National Trust for Scotland. Their riches speak for themselves!

The peat soils in many of our upland areas also contain significant stores of carbon. As part of our commitment both to improving the habitats under our care, and reducing our climate change impacts, the Trust carries out peatland restoration projects in our uplands. More information on these projects and the amount of carbon stored across our lands can be found on the Trust’s Conserving Natural Capital minisite.