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Aberdeen City & Shire

Visiting National Trust for Scotland properties in Aberdeenshire takes you on a fascinating voyage through history in this beautiful part of the world.

          

Proud Leith Hall, near Huntly, was home to the Leith-Hay family for ten generations from 1650. The collections give a fascinating insight into the family’s changing tastes and aspirations over the centuries.

For over 400 years, the Frasers were lairds of Castle Fraser, near Inverurie. The castle is filled with quirky features, mementos and portraits, all with colourful stories to tell about the family.

It’s said that atmospheric Fyvie Castle is still occupied by the spirits of some of the families who lived there over the centuries.

It’s said that atmospheric Fyvie Castle is still occupied by the spirits of some of the families who lived there over the centuries. Even if you don’t believe in ghosts, this is a fine baronial castle, full of treasures and curios.  

West of Aberdeen, Drum Castle reflects 700 years of turbulent history, although the beautiful Garden of Historic Roses casts a spell of tranquillity.  

Iconic pink Craigievar Castle may well have inspired Walt Disney.

Iconic pink Craigievar Castle may well have inspired Walt Disney, and it’s bound to inspire visitors today. With no artificial light beyond the ground floor, you’ll enjoy an authentic experience in this Scottish Baronial castle.

Haddo House, north of Aberdeen, combines crisp Georgian architecture with sumptuous Victorian interiors. Its links to Queen Victoria and Prime Minister William Gladstone add to its appeal as an intriguing destination.  

Mar Lodge Estate is a paradise for walkers, climbers and wildlife enthusiasts.

Mar Lodge Estate lies at the heart of the Cairngorms and the wild, beautiful landscape consists of moorland, mountains, Caledonian pine forest and wetlands. It’s a paradise for walkers, climbers and wildlife enthusiasts.

And finally, though by no means least, the displays at Pitmedden Garden will inspire gardeners whatever time of year they visit. The walled garden,originally planned in 1675, now contains almost 6 miles of box hedging, making up elaborate parterres filled with thousands of bedding plants.

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